Roosevelt, Franklin D.

Displaying 37 - 48 of 80
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides the latest information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "I missed a call from [Joseph B.] Shannon... Jim P. [Pendergast] said he hoped I'd keep him here but I'm glad he's going home. He says [Lloyd C.] Stark will run against [Bennett C.] Clark and not against me."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Carroll Arms Hotel in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his recent travels including a meeting with Roy A. Roberts, president and editor of The Kansas City Star. Truman says that "Both Mr. Stark & Mr. Milligan were in Roy Roberts room when Charlie and I made the rounds and they both looked and acted like men without a country."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman addresses the WPA controversy previously mentioned by Kitchen. He defends his decision in interest of cutting federal expenses where need is no longer as critical. He also addresses other issues that Kitchen believes might hurt the Democratic party in the 1940 election.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess that he will be calling President Roosevelt concerning James K. Vardaman, Jr and court proposition and executive reorganization plan.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman states that he does not believe that a Missouri judge will be appointed for the new position on the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. However, Truman welcomes Kitchen's help to appoint Missourian Charlie Carr.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter signed "Executive Secretary" to Hon. Drew Pearson, regarding the Missouri delegation to the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. The letter says that, despite the efforts of the "anti-Roosevelt forces, headed by Missouri's Senior Senator" Bennett Clark and the Pendergast machine, the Missouri delegation to the convention "will be guided ... by a strongly worded resolution praising President Roosevelt's leadership," favored by Governor Stark.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Jim Huron to Governor Lloyd C. Stark prior to his election as Missouri governor, recommending rest before the upcoming strenuous gubernatorial campaign, and predicting a political career leading to bigger things than governor.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from C. J. Hitchcock to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on March 22, 1934. Hitchcock praises Mitchell for his public attack on Thomas J. Pendergast and discusses unemployment among trained railroad men.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Governor Lloyd C. Stark to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, inviting Roosevelt to stop to speak at the State Capitol during a trip west. Stark writes that Roosevelt's "fine record and splendid help in aiding us in our local housecleaning is appreciated by every decent Missourian - certainly more than 90% of them."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Memorandum Prepared by Mr. Mitchell's Secretary Giving Content of Letter Written by Lyman G. Coffin of Kansas City, Missouri. The document recounts Coffin's part in a voter fraud incident on March 6, 1934. In attempt to get employment, Coffin took orders from a Pendergast precinct captain to "ghost" vote. After being exposed of voter fraud, he was severely injured by an anti-Pendergast gang. He requests that the Pendergast headquarters provide for his medical bills and for his wife until he is able to get a job.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Telegram from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to judge Casmir J. Welch on March 24, 1932. Mitchell encourages Cas Welch's support of Franklin D. Roosevelt for President.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Barney E. Reilly to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 23, 1932. Reilly discusses Franklin D. Roosevelt's primary campaign as it relates to Kansas City and northwestern Missouri politics.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.