Roosevelt, Franklin D.

Displaying 25 - 36 of 80
Genre: 
Manuscripts

Harry S. Truman's final draft of his statement on the reappointment of Maurice Milligan as U.S. Attorney. Truman strongly opposes Milligan's reappointment because he finds him to be morally and professionally unqualified. Specifically, Truman takes issue with Milligan's selection of the petit jury in the 1936 election voter fraud cases where no residents of Jackson County or acquaintances of the same were allowed to take part. Truman comments on this saying, "I say to this Senate, Mr.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides suggestions on how to secure Charlie Carr as the new judge of the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Kitchen suggests Truman talks to his close friends, Senator Byrnes and Attorney General Jackson, both of which are recent appointments to the Supreme Court. Kitchen provides reasons why Byrnes and Jackson might want to help them in their efforts.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses what may be done to facilitate the placement of a Missouri judge to the Eight Circuit Court of Appeals.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen warns that Democrats might have a difficult election in 1940 because of recent events in Congress. Kitchen suggests that Truman address some of these issues ahead of the 1940 campaign. Included is a reproduction of an article from the Armstrong Herald on February 16, 1939.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman reaffirms his aversion to those patronizing him: "For instance old man Porter, president of the Power and Light, wrote me the most patronizing letter you ever saw. I burned him to a cinder and mailed it while it was hot… The thing that makes me stronger than ever for F.D.R. is that most of these smart alecks tell me I'd better line up with Bennett."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman tells Bess of his meeting with President Roosevelt, Bennett C. Clark, and Clarence Cannon concerning relief for flood victims. Truman adds that, "I had a chance to tell Mr. Roosevelt what I thought of Mr. Mitchell. He very readily agreed with me."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his visit with Franklin D. Roosevelt and their discussion about Lloyd C. Stark: "Went to see the President about a bill and he insisted on talking Mo. politics and telling me what a funny Governor we have. He didn't say phony but that's what he meant."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel and speaks about Kansas City Bar Association President Henry Depping: "Depping is a Republican and one of the inner circle in K.C. He told me he'd try to get enough Republican candidates into the Senatorial race so they wouldn't vote in my primary."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of a growing rift between Truman and Bennett C. Clark: "Bennett, I suppose will be in Kansas City Saturday. I told him if he was looking for a split in the Democratic Party he could very easily find it and perhaps now is as good a time as any to have it."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen informs Truman that he spoke with Col. Bob Walton of Armstrong, Missouri. After explaining Truman's side of the story concerning the WPA issue, Kitchen reports that Walton agrees with Truman, but is still worried about the Democratic party in the 1940 campaign.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides detailed intelligence concerning the appointment of a new judge position on the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Kitchen believes that the probability of a Iowan appointment to the court is now less likely, and that Missourian Charlie Carr might have a more favorable chance.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman comments on Lloyd C. Stark running for the Senate while still the governor of Missouri. Truman then reflects on his past influence in Kansas City: "My patronage troubles were the result of the rotten situation in Kansas City and also the jealous disposition of my colleague. While the President is unreliable, the things he's stood for are, in my opinion, best for the country, and jobs should not interfere with general principles."

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.