Roosevelt, Franklin D.

Displaying 13 - 24 of 80
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from J. W. Thompson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark concerning social security pensions and Thompson's view of Missouri politicians. He admits he does not like Bennett C. Clark, but as an anti-Pendergast voter, Thompson believes "Clark is better than Truman at his best."

Genre: 
Pamphlets

Pamphlet is support of Maurice M. Milligan for U.S. Senator of Missouri. Milligan ran in opposition to current Senator Harry S. Truman and lost the primary because the anti-Pendergast vote was split between Milligan and Lloyd C. Stark.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Thomas McGee to Harry S. Truman in which McGee discusses the removal of Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. from his appointment as assistant secretary of commerce in the Roosevelt Administration.

Genre: 
Clippings

Southeastern Missouri newspaper clipping reporting on Governor Lloyd C. Stark's campaign announcement for U.S. Senator of Missouri. The author favors Senator Harry S. Truman for reelection as he is believed to have a better chance of beating a Republican nominee over his Democratic rivals Stark and Maurice M. Milligan. The author then paints a favorable portrait of Truman and tells the reader to not fear his association with Pendergast, saying, "Don't be foolish enough to vote against him [Truman] just because Tom Pendergast was for him.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Fred Canfil to Harry S. Truman in which Canfil presents a way to sway the vote of the WPA workers for the upcoming primary election by speaking critically of Lloyd C. Stark.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman to Thomas McGee in which Truman informs McGee he was able to speak with President Franklin D. Roosevelt and reassure him that Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. was not recommended for political appointment by Pendergast Organization, or by the state organization of Missouri. Mitchell was recently removed from his position as assistant secretary of commerce.

Genre: 
Essays

Essay documenting the relationship between the author's father Alex Sachs and Harry S. Truman. The author addresses their first meeting, Pendergast Machine involvement, and immigration of family members from Germany to the United States. Howard Sachs also includes details of their relationship post-World War II.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of a growing rift between Truman and Bennett C. Clark: "Bennett, I suppose will be in Kansas City Saturday. I told him if he was looking for a split in the Democratic Party he could very easily find it and perhaps now is as good a time as any to have it."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen informs Truman that he spoke with Col. Bob Walton of Armstrong, Missouri. After explaining Truman's side of the story concerning the WPA issue, Kitchen reports that Walton agrees with Truman, but is still worried about the Democratic party in the 1940 campaign.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides detailed intelligence concerning the appointment of a new judge position on the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Kitchen believes that the probability of a Iowan appointment to the court is now less likely, and that Missourian Charlie Carr might have a more favorable chance.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman comments on Lloyd C. Stark running for the Senate while still the governor of Missouri. Truman then reflects on his past influence in Kansas City: "My patronage troubles were the result of the rotten situation in Kansas City and also the jealous disposition of my colleague. While the President is unreliable, the things he's stood for are, in my opinion, best for the country, and jobs should not interfere with general principles."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides the latest information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "I missed a call from [Joseph B.] Shannon... Jim P. [Pendergast] said he hoped I'd keep him here but I'm glad he's going home. He says [Lloyd C.] Stark will run against [Bennett C.] Clark and not against me."

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