Reed, Nell Donnelly

Displaying 85 - 96 of 107
Genre: 
Photographs

Photograph of the Corrigan Building at 1828 Walnut, Kansas City, Missouri, occupied at the time by The Donnelly Garment Company beginning in 1928. This vantage point faces northeast on 19th Street from just east of Main Street.

Genre: 
Photographs

Photograph of the receiving department at The Donnelly Garment Company in the Corrigan Building at 1828 Walnut, Kansas City, Missouri. All raw materials are received and processed in this room on the third floor.

Genre: 
Photographs

Photograph of a police officer restraining a protester at a demonstration on March 17, 1937 by the International Ladies Garment Workers Union. This image was captured outside of the Gordon Brothers Garment Company, Gernes Garment Company, and Missouri Garment Company building at 2617 Grand Avenue (now Grand Boulevard), Kansas City, Missouri. The sit-in turned into a riot as violence began between garment company workers, union protesters, and police. This photograph was taken near the back entrance of the building by Kansas City Journal-Post newspaper photographer George Cauthen.

Genre: 
Clippings

Full-page advertisement by International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU) in the June 8, 1937 issue of the Kansas City Journal-Post. The ILGWU responds to criticism directed towards the union by the Kansas City Citizens' Protective Council, Inc. in a May 13, 1937 advertisement. The ILGWU also includes an excerpt of a speech made by Frank Prins at garment industry dinner in Kansas City on March 6, 1937.

Genre: 
Clippings

Front page to the February 15, 1939 issue of Justice, a magazine published by the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union in Jersey City, New Jersey. Pictured are three undergarment workers employed at the Hoosick Falls (NY) Undergarment Company and a cartoon of Abraham Lincoln.

Genre: 
Photographs

Photograph of the Corrigan Building at 1828 Walnut, Kansas City, Missouri, occupied at the time by The Donnelly Garment Company beginning in 1928. This vantage point faces northwest towards the front of the building from 19th Street between Walnut Street and Grand Avenue (now Grand Boulevard).

Genre: 
Photographs

Photograph of the shipping stock room, at The Donnelly Garment Company in the Corrigan Building at 1828 Walnut, Kansas City, Missouri. Items in this room are prepared and processed for shipment.

Genre: 
Photographs

Photograph of protestors at a demonstration on March 17, 1937 by the International Ladies Garment Workers Union. This image was captured outside of the Grand Avenue Building, location of the Gordon Brothers Garment Company, Gernes Garment Company, and Missouri Garment Company building at 2617 Grand Avenue (now Grand Boulevard), Kansas City, Missouri. The sit-in turned into a riot as violence began between garment company workers, union protesters, and police.

Genre: 
Pamphlets

A pamphlet showcasing six wardrobes from Nelly Don Soapsuds Fashions'. This specific document was mailed to Miss Adelaide Navious of 3028 Baltimore Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri. The pamphlet also advertises Nelly Don Week, April 27 to May 3 at Emery, Bird, Thayer & Company at 1016-1018 Grand Avenue (now Grand Boulevard), Kansas City, Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

A form letter from International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU) Director of Publicity Max D. Danish to garment merchandisers. Danish informs the recipients that the ILGWU has taken out an advertisement in the Kansas City Star, Kansas City Times, Kansas City Journal-Post and New York Women's Wear Daily relating to a "controversy concerning collective bargaining" between the Donnelly Garment Company and the ILGWU.

Genre: 
Photographs

Photograph of the cutting room at The Donnelly Garment Company in the Corrigan Building at 1828 Walnut, Kansas City, Missouri.

Genre: 
Photographs

Photograph of the cafeteria at The Donnelly Garment Company in the Corrigan Building at 1828 Walnut, Kansas City, Missouri. The employees are provided food there "at a minimum cost."

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