Reed, James A.

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Kidnapping of Nell Donnelly

Nell Donnelly and her chauffeur, George Blair, were kidnapped on December 16, 1931. Donnelly had become famous after her 1916 founding of the Donnelly Garment Company, which sold stylish but affordable dresses for daily wear by ordinary women. Backed by the sales of “Nelly Don's,” as the dresses became known, the company grew into a multi-million dollar business with over 1,000 employees in the 1920s.

James Alexander Reed

James Reed was once an outsized figure in Missouri life and politics. An attorney by trade, Reed brought his skills as a shrewd prosecutor to each position he held in state and local government. A loyal ally to those he supported and a bitter enemy to those he disagreed with, Reed was sure to provoke strong responses in all who knew him. And though he was a polarizing figure in his day, often facing severe criticism and opposition, Reed never stopped fighting for what he believed in: a limited federal government, the sovereignty of the states, and individual liberty.

The Bitterest Battle: The ILGWU and Unionization in the Kansas City Garment District

The history of the Donnelly Garment Company and its battle with the International Ladies Garment Workers Union (ILGWU) is one that defies conventional understandings of American life in the Great Depression. It is a story of a female entrepreneur succeeding in an era of economic paralysis, and one of a union failing to organize a factory in a period when workers won substantive rights. ILGWU president David Dubinsky, Nell Donnelly Reed, and Senator James A. Reed were the principal figures in a contest to organize a single garment factory, a legal battle that came to represent much larger questions.

The Politics of Maternalism and the Kansas City Athenaeum Club

American women’s growing participation in public and political life during the 1920s was the cause of much national tension and debate. While many Americans felt that a woman’s proper place ought to be confined to the home, increasing numbers of women demanded influence outside that narrow sphere. After gaining the right to vote in 1920, women in Kansas City made their influence felt through their work in women’s clubs like the Athenaeum. This early training in civic reform efforts would ultimately position Kansas City women as one of the more powerful forces for change during the reform elections of 1940.

Report Outlining a Ten-Year Improvement Program for Kansas City, Jackson County, and the School District of Kansas City

A report of the Executive Committee to the Civic Improvement Committee of Kansas City outlining a Ten-Year Improvement Program for Kansas City, Jackson County, and the School District of Kansas City. It details each proposed project with an estimated cost.

Press on Kansas City's Ten-Year Plan

A collection of newspaper article reproductions concerning Kansas City's Ten-Year Plan. Most of these Kansas City Star and Kansas City Times articles of 1929-1931 detail Conrad H. Mann's work with the Ten-Year Plan.

Kansas City Mayors at Elks Club

Photograph of Mayor Frank Cromwell and former mayors: (left to right) James A. Reed, George M. Shelley, Darius A. Brown, Leander J. Talbot, Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., Cromwell, George H. Edwards, Jr., and Samuel B. Strother. They acted as honorary pallbearers at the funeral of Webster Davis at the Elks Club.

James A. Reed

Portrait of James A. Reed with finger in the air.

James A. Reed

Photograph of James Alexander Reed (1861-1944), 3/4 length portrait, seated, facing left.

House of James A. Reed

An autochrome photograph of James A. Reed's residence, taken from the southeast. Reed was a lawyer, county prosecutor, and mayor of Kansas City.

Future: Vol. II, No. 1

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the “lug,” “an involuntary or forced contribution to something a luckless employee isn’t nearly as interested in” as his and his family’s own welfare. Other featured articles include “T. J. and W. T.” (page 2), about patching up of differences between William Kemper, Sr. ("Democratic national committeeman for Missouri") and Tom Pendergast (Democratic No.

Future: Vol. I, No. 26

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about crime in Kansas City, the lack of accurate, trustworthy records about its frequency and location, and the city’s “inefficient, politically-controlled police department.” Other featured articles include: “Mister Welching” (p.