Pendergast, Thomas J.

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Genre: 
Postcards

Unsigned postcard, postmarked Kansas City, Kansas, addressed to Judge Arthur D. Wood, asking if he is "going to pardon that crook from KC," Tom Pendergast. The writer says that doing so would "encourage others to steal likewise," and that the sentence should have been ten times longer. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Transcriptions

Transcript of minutes from Tom Pendergast's parole hearing before Arthur D. Wood, chairman of the United States Board of Parole. Pendergast notes his health problems, including a bad heart and colostomy, and lack of prior convictions, as reasons he should be released from the penitentiary. He also discusses his family, his role at Ready Mixed Concrete Company, and a pending indictment in state court.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Memorandum from the Leavenworth Penitentiary's record clerk regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, communicating the order from the U.S. District Court to turn Pendergast over to his probation officer upon his discharge from the penitentiary on May 30, 1940. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Correspondence
Miscellaneous Documents

Letter from N. R. Timmons, Chief Parole Officer at the Leavenworth Penitentiary, to the Jackson County Recorder of Deeds, requesting confirmation of the marital status of Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Recorder John P. Sherrod replies with confirmation that Pendergast married Carolyn "Carrie" E. Snider on February 3, 1911. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Memorandum from W. Harold Lane, Internal Revenue Service Special Agent, to the Special Agent in Charge (elsewhere identified as Charles O'B. Berry), regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo reports that, in a discussion with Governor Lloyd Stark about the conviction of Charles Gargotta for assault of Sheriff Thomas Bash, Stark stated that he suspected that Pendergast was "directing his political organization" while in prison.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

List of relatives and requested correspondents for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, which includes the names and mailing addresses of his parents, wife, daughters, and other friends and family. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Dr. A. Sophian to James V. Bennett, director of the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Sophian writes that he has been Pendergast's doctor, and writes that he has advised Pendergast to smoke "denicotinized cigarettes in moderation" to avoid aggravating his heart disease, and asks that he be permitted these special cigarettes in the penitentiary where otherwise only ordinary cigarettes are available.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from U.S. Marshal A. D. Fairbanks to James V. Bennett, Director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Fairbanks writes that "our friend, Frank Smith, is very anxious to visit" Pendergast before his release from prison, just one month in the future, and inquiring as to whether this would be possible. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Memorandum written by Justin K. Fuller, Medical Director of the United States Bureau of Prisons, regarding a medical report on Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo discusses Pendergast's health, and notes that a "heart such as this is a very serious thing indeed," and that it is hard to predict how long he might live. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Lewis J. Grout, Chief U.S. Probation Officer, to Myrl E. Alexander, Acting Parole Executive with the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Grout summarizes Pendergast's case, noting he plead guilty to multiple charges of income tax evasion, and notes that there are special conditions of probation, including paying a fine and back taxes. Grout also draws attention to editorials from the May 22, 1939 edition of the Kansas City Star and the May 23, 1939 edition of the Kansas City Times.

Genre: 
Photographs

Photograph of Edward L. Schneider, former aid to Thomas J. Pendergast. The caption on the back of the image reads, "CC 230102c... (Chicago Bureau) SUICIDE OR HOAX? KANSAS CITY, MO. - Edward L. Schneider of Kansas City Mo., who disappeared leaving suicide notes after appearing before the grand jury to testify concerning the affairs of Boss Tom Pendergast, whose aid he was. While police seek his body, federal investigators are checking theories of hoax and foul play. BFM#26-A 5-2-39. YOUR CREDIT LINE MUST READ "ACME"."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Memorandum from Robert H. Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, to James V. Bennett, director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo discusses Pendergast assigning his lawyers power of attorney to deal with his income tax liability with the Treasury Department, and lists Pendergast's visitor log, including attorneys and Treasury Department agents. The memo also notes that Pendergast has paid "a substantial portion" of his back taxes owed. Also included is a letter of introduction from Charles O'B.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.