Pendergast, Thomas J.

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Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from Mattie Acock to Franklin D. Roosevelt

Letter from Mattie Acock to President Franklin D. Roosevelt regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Acock writes asking for Roosevelt to support Pendergast's parole, and says that Governor Lloyd Stark is mad because Pendergast got former governor Guy B.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from Lewis J. Grout to Myrl E. Alexander

Letter from Lewis J. Grout, Chief U.S. Probation Officer, to Myrl E. Alexander, Acting Parole Executive with the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Grout summarizes Pendergast's case, noting he plead guilty to multiple charges of income tax evasion, and notes that there are special conditions of probation, including paying a fine and back taxes. Grout also draws attention to editorials from the May 22, 1939 edition of the Kansas City Star and the May 23, 1939 edition of the Kansas City Times.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from James V. Bennett to Robert H. Hudspeth

Letter from James V. Bennett, Director of the Bureau of Prisons, to Robert Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Bennett writes regarding allegations made by Governor Lloyd Stark that Pendergast "was directing his political organization from Leavenworth," and his discussion about that issue with Elmer Irey, who works in Treasury Department law enforcement. Irey concluded that Stark was misinformed, and that Pendergast was not engaged in political activity from prison.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from James V. Bennett to A. D. Fairbanks

Letter from James V. Bennett, Director of the Bureau of Prisons, to U.S. Marshal A. D. Fairbanks regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. In it, Bennett writes that he does not believe they should depart from regulations to allow "special visits" from a Mr. Smith to Pendergast while in custody, and notes that Pendergast "has less than a month and a half yet to serve" and therefore will soon be free to have visitors at any time.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from Franklin Miller to Carl F. Zarter

Letter from Franklin Miller, Circuit Attorney for the City of St. Louis, to Carl Zarter, Record Clerk for the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The letter discusses the grand jury investigation into R. Emmet O'Malley, former State Superintendent of Insurance, and the charge of bribery with which he is being charged, and addresses the possible further investigation into Pendergast's role in that crime.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from Floy Smith to Parole Board

Letter from Floy Smith to the United States Parole Board regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Smith writes to protest the parole of Pendergast, saying that Pendergast surely "considered himself getting off very easy with only a 15-months' sentence," and that it would be just for him to serve the full sentence. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from Charles O'B. Berry to W. H. Woolf

Letter from Special Agent in Charge Charles O'B. Berry to W. H. Woolf, acting chief of the Intelligence Unit of the Bureau of Internal Revenue, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Berry addresses the concerns of Governor Lloyd C. Stark that Pendergast was engaged in his political machine while serving his sentence in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, in violation of the terms of his conviction.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from C. H. Waring to N. R. Timmons

Letter from C. H. Waring, Chief Medical Officer of the U.S. Public Health Service, to N. R. Timmons, parole officer, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Waring recommends that, due to Pendergast's poor health, the Board of Parole interview him in his hospital ward at Leavenworth Penitentiary, and specifically notes his numerous recent heart attacks, including one just a few weeks prior. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from C. H. Waring to Justin K. Fuller

Letter from C. H. Waring, Chief Medical Officer of the United States Public Health Service, to Justin K. Fuller, Medical Director of the United States Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The letter summarizes Pendergast's health problems, including heart disease, and treatments. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from Adolph Kern to Richard A. Chappell

Letter from Adolph P. Kern, Chief Probation Officer of Hudson County, New Jersey, to the Honorable Richard A. Chappell, Supervisor of Federal Probation, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Kern writes on behalf of Judge Thomas J. Brown, inquiring ask to probation terms which state that Pendergast cannot engage in politics upon his release, and wanting to know the "authority by which a person can be restrained from reentering public life" while on probation.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from A. Sophian to James V. Bennett

Letter from Dr. A. Sophian to James V. Bennett, director of the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Sophian writes that he has been Pendergast's doctor, and writes that he has advised Pendergast to smoke "denicotinized cigarettes in moderation" to avoid aggravating his heart disease, and asks that he be permitted these special cigarettes in the penitentiary where otherwise only ordinary cigarettes are available.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from A. D. Fairbanks to James V. Bennett

Letter from U.S. Marshal A. D. Fairbanks to James V. Bennett, Director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Fairbanks writes that "our friend, Frank Smith, is very anxious to visit" Pendergast before his release from prison, just one month in the future, and inquiring as to whether this would be possible. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.