Pendergast, Thomas J.

Displaying 817 - 828 of 902
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Frederick E. Whitten to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 21, 1935. Despite talk in Kansas City of Thomas J. Pendergast's power in Washington D.C., Whitten praises Mitchell for his stance against Pendergast's influence. He comments, "Socialism, Bossism, and gang control have no part in Democratic or American Government, and those of us who have a true concern and regard for the history and accomplishments of the Democratic party cannot help but look with alarm to the future of the party."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to William Hirth, publisher and managing editor of The Missouri Farmer, on April 20, 1940. Mitchell supports Lloyd C. Stark's efforts to dismantle the Pendergast Machine, but says that he cannot endorse Stark or anyone else that supports the New Deal. Mitchell also states that "The machine is by no means dead," and that it "is very much alive, not only in Kansas City, but throughout the state." He then provides his opinion on the outlook of the upcoming election for U.S. Senator from Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William Hirth to Ralph F. Lozier. Hirth speculates that if James P. Aylward enters the U.S. Senatorial race, Hulen will not announce and Aylward would have the support of the Kansas City and St. Louis Democratic Organizations.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from John T. Barker to Ralph F. Lozier in which Barker states that anyone that Thomas J. Pendergast supports will win the primary election in 1932. He then provides details on his predictions of election results.

Genre: 
Transcriptions

Transcript of testimony given by Thomas J. Pendergast Jr. in the office of the Intelligence Unit of the Internal Revenue Service at 1301 Oak Street, Kansas City, Missouri. Internal Revenue Agent P. J. McGrath asks various questions related to Thomas J. Pendergast Jr.'s finances starting in 1932.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Senator James A. Reed to Tom Pendergast asking for his assistance in getting William P. Ryan work.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from James A. Reed to Tom Pendergast recommending that he support Lee B. Ewing for Congress.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Elsie Belle McD to Governor Lloyd C. Stark discussing support throughout the state for James Douglas in his campaign for the Missouri State Supreme Court.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Dr. W. T. Elam to Governor Lloyd C. Stark. Elam writes that he heard that he "had been classified in [Stark's] mind as a Pendergast follower." He denies this and states that he feels "that every good citizen should back you up in your stand against bossism."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter signed "Who Knows" to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing Louis Stigall, Chief Counsel of the Highway Department, reporting that he has allegiances to Pendergast. Per the letter, Stigall "has always claimed his appointment came from T. J. Pendergast and that he was closely connected with him for years," and the writer describes Still as "an enemy in your camp" who is "snooping around gathering information to relay to Pendergast."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Amos E. Alexander to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, professing support for James M. Douglas, but expressing concern for the number of Pendergast appointees in state offices and the poor administration of pensions to retirees, reporting "one old fellow over eighty one years old draws only ten dollars a month."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Postcard from E. E. West to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, stating his support for James M. Douglas in the upcoming Supreme Court primary and accusing corruption in city concrete business. He reports that the city won't pass inspections for builders who mix their own concrete, "but if Ready Mix furnishes it they pass it without seeing it."

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.