Pendergast, Thomas J.

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Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the “lug,” “an involuntary or forced contribution to something a luckless employee isn’t nearly as interested in” as his and his family’s own welfare. Other featured articles include “T. J. and W. T.” (page 2), about patching up of differences between William Kemper, Sr. ("Democratic national committeeman for Missouri") and Tom Pendergast (Democratic No.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, discussing the difficulty of accessing city records for citizens or reporters. Other featured articles include: “Snapshots” (p. 1), with quick items that include Nell Donnelly Reed having been rated fourth in a list of the most prominent business women in the country; “Seven Eleven” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a notice that Future’s publishers plan to temporarily suspend publication to reorganize the paper, and also note that “youth is interested and youth is organizing,” and “FUTURE is their paper.” Other featured articles include: “Why Charge a Cover?” (p.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Certificate of Conditional Release for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, stating that Pendergast is receiving a reduction of 90 days from his original sentence on the condition that a fine of $10,000 and past due income taxes are paid. The document also lists Lewis J. Grout as Pendergast's probation officer, and includes a receipt noting the $10,000 fine was paid on April 29, 1940. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Adolph P. Kern, Chief Probation Officer of Hudson County, New Jersey, to the Honorable Richard A. Chappell, Supervisor of Federal Probation, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Kern writes on behalf of Judge Thomas J. Brown, inquiring ask to probation terms which state that Pendergast cannot engage in politics upon his release, and wanting to know the "authority by which a person can be restrained from reentering public life" while on probation.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Mattie Acock to Ruby Carr at the Justice Department regarding Tom Pendergast. Acock writes that Pendergast is a "good man" who gave her husband a job and has been "so good to the poor people," and she hopes he "will get to come home right away. She also writes at length about being poor and her other difficulties. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Conditional release statement for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, detailing his intention to return to living with his wife and family, and return to his work at Ready-Mixed Concrete, upon his release from prison. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Educational Department report for the United States Board of Parole for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The document indicates that Pendergast had no enrollments in educational activities or correspondence courses. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Postcards

Unsigned postcard, postmarked Kansas City, Kansas, addressed to Judge Arthur D. Wood, asking if he is "going to pardon that crook from KC," Tom Pendergast. The writer says that doing so would "encourage others to steal likewise," and that the sentence should have been ten times longer. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Transcriptions

Transcript of minutes from Tom Pendergast's parole hearing before Arthur D. Wood, chairman of the United States Board of Parole. Pendergast notes his health problems, including a bad heart and colostomy, and lack of prior convictions, as reasons he should be released from the penitentiary. He also discusses his family, his role at Ready Mixed Concrete Company, and a pending indictment in state court.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Memorandum from the Leavenworth Penitentiary's record clerk regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, communicating the order from the U.S. District Court to turn Pendergast over to his probation officer upon his discharge from the penitentiary on May 30, 1940. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Correspondence
Miscellaneous Documents

Letter from N. R. Timmons, Chief Parole Officer at the Leavenworth Penitentiary, to the Jackson County Recorder of Deeds, requesting confirmation of the marital status of Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Recorder John P. Sherrod replies with confirmation that Pendergast married Carolyn "Carrie" E. Snider on February 3, 1911. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

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