Pendergast, Thomas J.

Displaying 49 - 60 of 902
Genre: 
Photographs
Clippings

Clipping entitled "A Powerful Team" from the Kansas City Star on March 28, 1932 showing highlights from the Democratic State Convention in St. Louis, Missouri. The photograph's caption states, "Casimir J. Welch, on the left, posing with the "big" boss, T. J. Pendergast."

Genre: 
Clippings
Photographs

Clipping entitled "'Why Not Talk It Over?'" from the Kansas City Journal-Post on June 19, 1937 with caption stating, "'Instead of having mass meetings,' T. J. Pendergast (shown above) told a group of the city's business leaders Saturday, 'Why don’t you men name a committee of employers to represent you and have that committee sit across the table from a committee of union labor representatives? I think you will accomplish a lot more if you thresh this thing out calmly and peacefully.'"

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 4 and 8, about the "anti-machine speech" by Missouri state representative J. A. Gray broadcast "over station WOS in Jefferson City," Missouri, cut off in mid-transmission after scathing indictments of Tom Pendergast, with a copy of the speech in full. Other featured articles include: “Lunch-hooks Out of the Cookie Jar” (p.

Memorandum from John N. McCormick to Harold G. Robinson regarding former Kansas City city councilman Hurley Daily's remarks on the issue of election fraud. According to Daily, there were 60,000 "ghost votes" in 1937, and that "it was a general procedure in a primary, votes could be bought for fifty cents and general elections one dollar." Daily also offers the opinion that Tom Pendergast and former crime boss Charles Carollo were behind the John Lazia murder.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, describing the inequality of property tax assessments throughout Jackson County and other costs of homeownership. Other featured articles include: “He Beats the Rap but You Take It” (p.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter labeled "PERSONAL" from S. H. Toucey to Senator Estes Kefauver, regarding his Special Committee to Investigate Organized Crime in Interstate Commerce. Toucey writes that he doesn't "like CRIME anymore than the United States Senate do," and goes on to summarize his view of election fraud andand insurance scandals in Kansas City and Jackson County.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the escape from federal police in Kansas City of Sam Randazzo, "a St. Louis gangster" being released from Leavenworth, with the help of police officials Otto Higgins and Jeff Rayen. Other featured articles include: “Patriots Go to Riverside” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, discussing aspects of democracy and good government, and suggesting problems and solutions for clean elections. Other featured articles include: "Health and Politics" (pp.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the Kansas Citians of Italian descent and their often unfair treatment in the newspapers for their comparatively few members of organized crime, and descriptions of several "cultured and law-abiding" local Italians such as musicians M. A. Lenge, N. DeRubertis, Mike Russo, Arturo Corti, Gustavo Corti, and Rosemarie Brancato; artists Dante Cosentino, Frank Tommassini, and Paulo D'Anna; and scientists and teachers Dr.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, with a photo and description of Kansas City FBI agent Lieutenant William Gordon, "commended by J. Edgar Hoover," in an article about the crime-fighting operations of the Federal Bureau of Investigations and its relation to Kansas City crime. Sheriff Bash, Chief Coffey, Director Reppert, Chief of Detectives Thomas Higgins, and Lieutenant George Rayen are also discussed. Other featured articles include: “Journey to the K.C.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the apartments on the Country Club Plaza and Armour Boulevard managed by the Assured Rental Company (led by George Goldman and Herman Shapiro), in the city's "South Side," voting against the Pendergast ticket City Council nominees.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, asserting that it “is well established that there are approximately three thousand persons drawing pay from the city when the work actually is being done by about fifteen hundred,” the impact that has on salaries, and the departments in which the issue is most evident. Other featured articles include: “You May Live Till March, Cabbies” (p.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.