Pendergast, Thomas J.

Displaying 157 - 168 of 902
Genre: 
Ephemera

Typed on United States Senate Memorandum paper, this list includes the names and addresses of every Pendergast Democratic Organization officer and ward leader including Thomas J. Pendergast, James M. Pendergast, George Harrington, Elijah Mathes, and B. W. Gnefkow.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then shows his political persistence: "If I quit this thing now, they'll say that Kemper and the Boss pulled me off, and I'm going to go through with it if I don't get home at all."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this candid letter, Truman updates Bess on his meeting with Tom Pendergast in New York, saying that "Pendergast was as pleased to see me as if I'd been young Jim. We talked for three hours about everything under the sun. Discarded a couple of prominent candidates for governor..."

Genre: 
Clippings

An article by Kenneth P. Middleton entitled "Democratic Rift Widens Over Jobs", included in the Kansas City Journal issue of July 30, 1940. The article concerns a disagreement between democratic factions in Kansas City as to which democratic candidates to endorse. The clipping also includes a separate article that provides information on Harry S. Truman's upcoming rally that night at the Municipal Auditorium in Kansas City, Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides some candid information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "…[Bennett C.] Clark has definitely lined up with the Boss [Tom Pendergast] you see. He and Maurice Milligan almost came to blows the last time they met and now the Pres and [Lloyd C.] Stark are thinking of running him for Senator against Clark."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Governor Clinton in New York City to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this candid letter, Truman updates Bess on his morning and his trip to New York, saying that "[John N. Garner, Nathan L. Bachman, and William J. Bulow] had been to see T.J. [Tom Pendergast] and I must try to find out what they did tomorrow."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel and then provides information on the Missouri public's current opinion of Governor Lloyd C. Stark: "There are a number of letters from all over the state giving the governor a real dressing down. One calls him Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde-for T.J.P. to get elected and against him to get headlines."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Continental in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his visit with Tom Pendergast in New York, saying that he "... had a most pleasant visit with T. J. P. He [Pendergast] was as pleased to see me as a ten-year-old kid to see his lost pal."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on the political maneuvering of Maurice M. Milligan and Bennett C. Clark and mentions that "Then Canfil came in with a whole string of trouble which I got straightened out to some extent and now John Madden and R.R. Brewster are here on a parole for Pendergast."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and upcoming travel plans. He then candidly comments that "Pendergast wants to see me and Clark and I'm of the opinion that everything will be settled when we see him. Wouldn't the papers give something to know that?"

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his speech he gave the previous day and on some of the people he interacted with: "Reverend Foster is the most influential preacher in southeast Missouri and he spent the whole time getting all the facts on Pendergast and Stark. I made lots of hay I'll tell you. But it was hard work. They nearly pulled me to pieces."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his past week and of the telegrams he received that morning, one from Tom Pendergast "recommending a good for nothing bird for a job and I won't recommend him."

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