Nichols, Jesse Clyde (J.C.)

Displaying 25 - 36 of 37
Genre: 
Photographs

The Kansas City Welcoming Committee to Secretary Patrick J. Hurley and party under the auspices of Missouri River Navigation Association. Mr. Nichols can be seen in the back row, fourth from the left.

Genre: 
Photographs

Publicity photograph and signature of J. C. Nichols in 1935.

Genre: 
Photographs

This picture of the J. C. Nichols Company building was taken looking northeast on the north side of Ward Parkway just west of Central Street.

Genre: 
Photographs

Most any morning about 8:30 found Mr. J. C. Nichols entering the office at 310 Ward Parkway. Iron grillwork originally on the main doors was removed because doors were too heavy to be pushed open easily. This vantage point faces north on Ward Parkway between Central Street and Broadway Boulevard.

Genre: 
Photographs

This picture of the Plaza Dog Mart was taken looking west-northwest from atop the J. C. Nichols Company Building. Country Club Plaza merchants sponsored a dog mart where people interested in buying a dog could see and inspect many breeds of dog. This dog mart was located at the future site of the Plaza Medical Building.

Genre: 
Photographs

Formal presentation of Arbor Villa Park, developed by the J. C. Nichols Company. Pictured are J. C. Nichols and Shannon C. Douglass, President of the Armour Hills Homes Association. This vantage point faces north-northeast near the southeast corner of the intersection of 66th Terrace and Main Street.

Genre: 
Photographs

Directors and sponsors of the 1933 Country Club District Community Field Day, held on Southwest High School campus. Shown are John L. Shouse, George D. Melcher, J. C. Nichols, Miles C. Thomas, Howard E. A. Jones, Albert H. Monsees, and H. Merle Smith. This vantage point faces southeast towards the Sixth Church of Christ Scientist at the corner of 66th Terrace and Wornall Road from near the Southwest High School football field.

Genre: 
Photographs

View of Jesse Clyde Nichols home at 1214 Santa Fe Road (now 1214 West 55th Street). This vantage point faces east-northeast towards the residence from just north of Santa Fe Road between State Line Road and Ward Parkway.

Genre: 
Photographs

An autochrome photograph of J. C. Nichols's residence, taken from the south. Nichols was a nationally influential real estate developer.

B-25 Bomber
Author: 
Jason Roe
Kansas City Public Library

On December 7, 1940, the U.S. Army Air Corps announced that the Fairfax Industrial District in Kansas City, Kansas, would host a North American Aviation B-25 bomber production plant to prepare for the possibility of the United States entering World War II. The medium-sized bombers would eventually prove crucial to the American strategic bombing campaigns in the European and Pacific theatres.

J.C. Nichols
Author: 
Mary Frances Ivey
University of Kansas
Jesse Clyde (“J.C.”) Nichols was a nationally renowned city planner in Kansas City from the first decade of the 20th century to the 1950s, whose legacy has come under intense scrutiny for his practices of racial redlining and segregation. Among his mixed legacies are several subdivisions in suburban Kansas City, the Country Club Plaza, and the national spread of deed restrictions and homeowner associations
Thomas Hart Benton
Author: 
Mary Frances Ivey
University of Kansas

Thomas Hart Benton, one of the leaders of the Regionalist movement in American art, was a prolific painter, muralist, draughtsman, and sculptor from childhood until the end of his life in 1975. Today he is best known for his realist depictions of American life, which, in his own time, were perceived as directly opposed to modernist movements cultivated in Europe. His paintings, largely vignettes of daily life and ordinary rural characters, were simultaneously praised for their frankness and criticized for their gritty representations of American culture and history.

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KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
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