Murray, Matthew S.

Displaying 13 - 24 of 53
Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

U.S. Attorney Maurice M. Milligan's opening statement in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Milligan notes that Murray filed tax returns in each of those years, for considerably less than his actual income, i.e. reporting net income of $3,500.85 in 1935, but actually receiving $14,576.88, and that he defrauded the government out of $6,577.29 in total over those five years.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Judgment in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Judge Albert L. Reeves' statement addresses the issue of whether certain payments are to be considered gifts, as the defendant claims, or compensation, which would be taxable, says that the deciding factor between the two is the intention of the parties involved, and suggests further inquiry into that question is required. Those payments were made by John J. Pryor, E. L. Schneider, and T. J.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Sentencing in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Judge Albert L. Reeves notes that Murray was a successful man of good reputation, who permitted himself "to be drawn into an atmosphere and an environment of low standards" and "forsook the people it was his duty to faithfully serve." He sentences Murray to two years in a penitentiary "of the type of that at Leavenworth, Kansas" in each of the five counts, but orders that the sentences all run concurrently for a total of two years' imprisonment.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Judgment and commitment in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Murray was the Director of Public Works for Kansas City, Missouri, and Missouri Administrator of the Works Progress Administration, and was found guilty at trial on charges of tax evasion for the years 1935-1938, and sentenced to two years in the penitentiary for each of five counts, but all to be served concurrently.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Murray was the Director of Public Works for Kansas City, Missouri, and Missouri Administrator of the Works Progress Administration, and was charged in five counts with income tax evasion for the years 1934-1938. The indictment catalogs his sources of income and taxes paid for those years, as well as the outstanding tax amounts. Income sources include John J. Pryor, a Pendergast-affiliated contractor.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry Easley to Matthew S. Murray in which Easley informs Murray that men in Jasper County, MO are continually visiting him to seek employment with the Works Progress Administration, even though Easley is no longer Deputy State Administrator of the W.P.A.. He then updates Murray on public sentiment in Southwestern Missouri towards the Kansas City Organization.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter to James M. Pendergast in support of Harry Easley as a Works Progress Administration assistant for Southwestern Missouri because of his efforts in the election of Senator Harry S. Truman.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Fred Canfil to Harry S. Truman in which Canfil presents a way to sway the vote of the WPA workers for the upcoming primary election by speaking critically of Lloyd C. Stark.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and complains about the post office system for not receiving a letter, saying that, "It's like everything else under this Republican Gov't I guess just a lack of efficiency." Truman also mentions Kansas City director of public works Matthew S. Murray.

Genre: 
Narratives

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman exposes many of the names and relations of those involved with the Pendergast machine in Kansas City. Although supported by Pendergast, Truman comments on the machine thusly: "What chance is there for a clean honest administration of the city and county when a bunch vultures sit on the side lines and puke on the field[?]."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then candidly comments on Missouri politics, saying that, "Paul Dillon is all worried about the St. Louis situation and Matt Murray. They are in the midst of a big fight down there. Igor and the Mayor are fighting and I can't worry much."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and on the flattery he receives from his colleagues: "The Senators all pretended to miss me and were very cordial to me-so was the Vice President. He appreciated my contribution so much he wouldn't even open it."

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.