Mitchell, Ewing Young, Jr.

Displaying 73 - 84 of 107
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Westbrook Pegler, newspaper columnist, on September 13, 1940. Mitchell informs Pegler of Senator Carl Hatch's ties to Thomas J. Pendergast and Harry S. Truman.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from unknown to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on July 11, 1934. The author recounts John Lazia's death the day previous and provides an opinion on who may be at fault. Lazia's last words are recounted: "If anything is bad with me tell my friend Tom P. [Thomas J. Pendergast] I love him."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from George G. Vest, attorney and counselor at law, to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 10, 1932. Vest comments that Thomas J. Pendergast's personal physician, Dr. D. M. Nigro, would speak with Pendergast on Vest's behalf. He also discusses Franklin D. Roosevelt's Presidential primary campaign.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to R. E. Joyce on March 24, 1934. Mitchell inquires if it is true that Thomas J. Pendergast recently received a license to distill spirits.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from A. Ross Hill to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Hill discusses prospective candidates for U.S. Senate in Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 2, 1937. Plummer reports that a friend, Clif Langsdale, was able to extend her employment as deputy clerk at the Kansas City Court of Appeals potentially until August 1, 1937. She recounts a conversation she had with Bland in which Bland does not believe the court to be influenced by Pendergast since the machine does not dictate opinions. However, Plummer believes the court to be compromised since all recently hired employees come with a Pendergast endorsement.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Mrs. T. W. Marr to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 16, 1934, with attached letter. Marr urges Mitchell to combat the corruption in Kansas City and comments how she was turned down for a job in Marshall, Missouri because she did not have Thomas J. Pendergast's endorsement.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Barney E. Reilly to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 23, 1932. Reilly discusses Franklin D. Roosevelt's primary campaign as it relates to Kansas City and northwestern Missouri politics.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Barney E. Reilly to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on November 8, 1932. Reilly expresses his desire to position himself for one of Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration appointments. He requests Mitchell's help in securing one and proposes methods at acquiring influence from acquaintances for it.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Bernarr MacFadden on March 8, 1934. Mitchell provides an account of the political climate in Kansas City and requests that the Liberty Magazine write an exposé on the election fraud there. He also suggests that wealthy donors offer "rewards for convictions of corrupt judges and clerks of election and persons voting illegally."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from G. H Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 14, 1934. Foree speculates how the current field of U.S. Senate candidates for Missouri formed and who will win at election. He comments, "This coming primary is not one in which the choice of Democracy will win- it will be Boss manipulated."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Bernarr MacFadden on March 16, 1934. After learning that MacFadden may not be able to accomplish what Mitchell requested, Mitchell continues to stress the importance of exposing the voter fraud and suppression in Kansas City.

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