Mitchell, Ewing Young, Jr.

Displaying 61 - 72 of 107
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Mrs. T. W. Marr to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 16, 1934, with attached letter. Marr urges Mitchell to combat the corruption in Kansas City and comments how she was turned down for a job in Marshall, Missouri because she did not have Thomas J. Pendergast's endorsement.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Barney E. Reilly to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 23, 1932. Reilly discusses Franklin D. Roosevelt's primary campaign as it relates to Kansas City and northwestern Missouri politics.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Barney E. Reilly to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on November 8, 1932. Reilly expresses his desire to position himself for one of Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration appointments. He requests Mitchell's help in securing one and proposes methods at acquiring influence from acquaintances for it.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Bernarr MacFadden on March 8, 1934. Mitchell provides an account of the political climate in Kansas City and requests that the Liberty Magazine write an exposé on the election fraud there. He also suggests that wealthy donors offer "rewards for convictions of corrupt judges and clerks of election and persons voting illegally."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from G. H Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 14, 1934. Foree speculates how the current field of U.S. Senate candidates for Missouri formed and who will win at election. He comments, "This coming primary is not one in which the choice of Democracy will win- it will be Boss manipulated."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Bernarr MacFadden on March 16, 1934. After learning that MacFadden may not be able to accomplish what Mitchell requested, Mitchell continues to stress the importance of exposing the voter fraud and suppression in Kansas City.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to George G. Vest on May 21, 1932. Vest informs Mitchell that C. W. Greenwade will tell Pendergast that he fully supports Mitchell as a candidate for Congress. Vest advises Mitchell to get other colleagues to pressure Pendergast into supporting him, as Vest believes Pendergast's endorsement would create an easy campaign victory.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on January 28, 1934. Foree comments that Bennett C. Clark supports the candidacy of Ruby Hulen since Hulen does not have the support of Thomas J. Pendergast and would not be beholden to him.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Frederick E. Whitten to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on March 19, 1940. Whitten responds to William Hirth's suggestion that he run for office in the 1940 election.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Marie Plummer in which Mitchell congratulates Plummer on the extension of her employment at the Kansas City Court of Appeals. He then provides excerpts and a copy of Ewing C. Bland's most recent letter to Mitchell concerning Plummer. Mitchell also suggests that she begin searching for a new job immediately.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 19, 1934. In the U.S. Senate race, Foree notes candidates Jacob L. Milligan and John J. Cochran fighting each other, but notes little press in St. Louis on Harry S. Truman. On this point, Foree comments, "Pendergast never did hunt ducks with a brass band."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals Judge Ewing C. Bland, on December 31, 1920. Mitchell comments that Sanford Madden should not the support of all Kansas City political factions in order to be a strong candidate for marshal. Mitchell contends that Thomas J. Pendergast's endorsement is not needed if Madden has the support of James A. Reed and Judge Miles Bulger.

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