Mitchell, Ewing Young, Jr.

Displaying 49 - 60 of 107
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Richard Perry Spencer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 1, 1932. Spencer believes that every Pendergast-endorsed candidate should be defeated in the upcoming primary. Otherwise, a precedent might form where candidates spend more time vying for the support of Pendergast than the support of the people.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals judge Ewing C. Bland on January 18, 1937. Mitchell provides a heated and sometimes vulgar response to Bland's letters of May 14th and 16th, 1937. He asserts that James M. Pendergast influences the District Court of Appeals in Kansas City and that James P. Aylward is "not only hand in glove with the [Pendergast] outfit but is one of its exalted leaders." Mitchell implies that Bland should resign if Marie Plummer is not reinstated in her clerical position at the court.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from T. O'Donnell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 20, 1934. O'Donnell comments on the Democratic candidates in the 1934 campaign for U.S. Senator of Missouri. He implicates Harry S. Truman, saying he "has been so faithful in following the dictates of the political machine, that they have promoted him and now are trying to name him senator from this state, knowing well that the machine interests will never suffer from his acts."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Frank P. Walsh, attorney and counselor at law, to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 20, 1932. Walsh discusses Pendergast's patronage concerning Mitchell's and Franklin D. Roosevelt's individual campaigns.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Telegram from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals judge, Ewing C. Bland, on March 24, 1932. Mitchell requests that Bland meet with Judge Cas Welch and Jim Aylward on Mitchell's behalf.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Memorandum Prepared by Mr. Mitchell's Secretary Giving Content of Letter Written by Lyman G. Coffin of Kansas City, Missouri. The document recounts Coffin's part in a voter fraud incident on March 6, 1934. In attempt to get employment, Coffin took orders from a Pendergast precinct captain to "ghost" vote. After being exposed of voter fraud, he was severely injured by an anti-Pendergast gang. He requests that the Pendergast headquarters provide for his medical bills and for his wife until he is able to get a job.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Frederick R. Barkhurst to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 18, 1935. Barkhurst praises Mitchell for his stance against Thomas J. Pendergast and encourages Mitchell to run for the next governor of Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to J. W. McCammon. After Mitchell's first letter to McCammon of June 29, 1933, Mitchell provides additional instructions for McCammon in order for him to receive an appointment to Assistant Director of the Federal Home Loan Bank in Springfield, Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Foree discusses the possible outcome of the U.S. Senate campaign in Missouri. He predicts Bennett C. Clark will be "diplomatic enough and spineless enough in case Thurman [Truman] is nominated and elected... to get in the good graces of 'Boss Tom.'"

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to James A. Farley on March 20, 1934. Mitchell discusses C. W. Greenwade's appointment for postmaster at Springfield, Missouri as well as the upcoming election in Kansas City, Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from F. M. Kennard to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on July 1, 1936, regarding the lack of connection between Thomas J. Pendergast and the firm, Bowersock, Fizzel and Rhodes.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Kansas City Court of Appeals judge, Ewing C. Bland, to his uncle on January 13, 1933. Bland provides his analysis of the Missouri political landscape as Mitchell attempts seek political support in a campaign for office.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.