Mitchell, Ewing Young, Jr.

Displaying 49 - 60 of 107
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from C. H. Williams to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on March 7, 1934. Williams praises Mitchell in his fight against the Pendergast machine and inquires if there is a vacancy in Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration that Williams could fill.

Genre: 
Manuscripts

Two-page typewritten article titled, "Hon. John T. Wayland Overrules the U. S. Supreme Court and Appoints a Democrat. - A Republican After Holding the Sinecure for Thirty Years Is Deposed - An Interesting Story from Washington" by an unknown author. Includes a vote tally from Kansas City wards and handwritten notes in Ewing Young Mitchell Jr.'s hand.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Senator Manvel H. Davis on August 15, 1940. Mitchell discusses the results of the 1940 primary election in Missouri and stresses the importance of an honest election in November.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Langdon W. Post, in which Mitchell requests Post's projection of the Kansas City election results. He believes that, "the Pendergast machine will be smashed if there is anything like an honest count of votes."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from A. Ross Hill to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Hill discusses prospective candidates for U.S. Senate in Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to George G. Vest on July 9, 1932. Mitchell informs Vest of C. W. Greenwade's belief that Thomas J. Pendergast will not support more than 7-8 candidates for Congress. Thus, Mitchell suggests that Vest seeks the support of other Kansas City leaders in his campaign.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Westbrook Pegler, newspaper columnist, on September 13, 1940. Mitchell informs Pegler of Senator Carl Hatch's ties to Thomas J. Pendergast and Harry S. Truman.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from unknown to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on July 11, 1934. The author recounts John Lazia's death the day previous and provides an opinion on who may be at fault. Lazia's last words are recounted: "If anything is bad with me tell my friend Tom P. [Thomas J. Pendergast] I love him."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from George G. Vest, attorney and counselor at law, to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 10, 1932. Vest comments that Thomas J. Pendergast's personal physician, Dr. D. M. Nigro, would speak with Pendergast on Vest's behalf. He also discusses Franklin D. Roosevelt's Presidential primary campaign.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to R. E. Joyce on March 24, 1934. Mitchell inquires if it is true that Thomas J. Pendergast recently received a license to distill spirits.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from A. Ross Hill to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Hill discusses prospective candidates for U.S. Senate in Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 2, 1937. Plummer reports that a friend, Clif Langsdale, was able to extend her employment as deputy clerk at the Kansas City Court of Appeals potentially until August 1, 1937. She recounts a conversation she had with Bland in which Bland does not believe the court to be influenced by Pendergast since the machine does not dictate opinions. However, Plummer believes the court to be compromised since all recently hired employees come with a Pendergast endorsement.

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