Milligan, Maurice M.

Displaying 37 - 48 of 56

From Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen, May 30, 1940

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman replies to Kitchen's letter concerning Milligan's campaign and a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation. He also inquires if Charlie Carr sent the required documents in his proposed appointment to Judge of the Eight Circuit Court of Appeals.

From Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen, December 10, 1937

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman responds to Kitchen's suggestion of a way for Truman to put in a replacement for Maurice M. Milligan as U.S. attorney at Kansas City.

From Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen, August 15, 1940

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Truman comments on the difficulties of the primary campaign and responds to Kitchens suggestions on the fall campaign.

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, September 28, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman provides his personal account of the Grand Lodge of Missouri Convention in Saint Louis, Missouri and his successful election to Deputy Master. Truman says, "If my friends hadn't put forth such an effort for me I'd have told 'em to go to hell with the office - and I almost did anyway. I'm glad now I didn't."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, September 25, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on the political maneuvering of Maurice M. Milligan and Bennett C. Clark and mentions that "Then Canfil came in with a whole string of trouble which I got straightened out to some extent and now John Madden and R.R. Brewster are here on a parole for Pendergast."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, November 28, 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides some candid information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "…[Bennett C.] Clark has definitely lined up with the Boss [Tom Pendergast] you see. He and Maurice Milligan almost came to blows the last time they met and now the Pres and [Lloyd C.] Stark are thinking of running him for Senator against Clark."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, July 24, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides his opinion on Maurice M. Milligan and Lloyd C. Stark: "I don't want Milligan to run unless he and Stark run together. That would be too good."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, December 9, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Carroll Arms Hotel in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his recent travels including a meeting with Roy A. Roberts, president and editor of The Kansas City Star. Truman says that "Both Mr. Stark & Mr. Milligan were in Roy Roberts room when Charlie and I made the rounds and they both looked and acted like men without a country."

From Grover Childers to Lloyd C. Stark

Letter from Grover Childers to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, suggesting that the Pendergast machine hopes Stark will run against Maurice Milligan in the Senate race in an attempt to defeat both of them.

From Gertrude Wyatt to Lloyd C. Stark

Letter from Gertrude Wyatt to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing calm and "no opposition workers in the field" during the recent election.

From Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to William Hirth

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to William Hirth, publisher and managing editor of The Missouri Farmer, on April 20, 1940. Mitchell supports Lloyd C. Stark's efforts to dismantle the Pendergast Machine, but says that he cannot endorse Stark or anyone else that supports the New Deal. Mitchell also states that "The machine is by no means dead," and that it "is very much alive, not only in Kansas City, but throughout the state." He then provides his opinion on the outlook of the upcoming election for U.S. Senator from Missouri.

From Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Westbrook Pegler

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Westbrook Pegler, newspaper columnist, on September 13, 1940. Mitchell informs Pegler of Senator Carl Hatch's ties to Thomas J. Pendergast and Harry S. Truman.