Milligan, Maurice M.

Displaying 25 - 36 of 57
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman responds to Kitchen's suggestion of a way for Truman to put in a replacement for Maurice M. Milligan as U.S. attorney at Kansas City.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Truman comments on the difficulties of the primary campaign and responds to Kitchens suggestions on the fall campaign.

Genre: 
Manuscripts

Harry S. Truman's final draft of his statement on the reappointment of Maurice Milligan as U.S. Attorney. Truman strongly opposes Milligan's reappointment because he finds him to be morally and professionally unqualified. Specifically, Truman takes issue with Milligan's selection of the petit jury in the 1936 election voter fraud cases where no residents of Jackson County or acquaintances of the same were allowed to take part. Truman comments on this saying, "I say to this Senate, Mr.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Carroll Arms Hotel in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his recent travels including a meeting with Roy A. Roberts, president and editor of The Kansas City Star. Truman says that "Both Mr. Stark & Mr. Milligan were in Roy Roberts room when Charlie and I made the rounds and they both looked and acted like men without a country."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Charles L. Dunham to Jesse Barrett describing his political activities over the years and his opposition to the Pendergast Machine in Kansas City.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Statement by a rival of Lloyd Stark in the 1936 Democratic primary for governor. The writer states "when I entered the gubernatorial contest my only hope was that I might help to arouse the people of our State against the infamy of the Pendergast machine," and was concerned about Stark's endorsement by the Pendergast machine. In light of Stark's work to clean up government and elections, however, he states "my attitude for the Governor's courage has become one of unstinted admiration."

Genre: 
Clippings

St. Louis Star-Times article about the 1936 investigation into election fraud, including a sketch of Pendergast by Thomas Hart Benton. The article reports Pendergast "said today that he had been investigated so often that 'one more doesn't bother me much.'" He argued that he had no idea of any election fraud.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from I. N. Watson to Jesse Barrett describing his work coordinating a new slate of city council candidates and other attempts to oust the Pendergast Machine from power.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Robert Locke, Kansas City Journal-Post science editor, to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, requesting Stark's approval to start a "Stark for President" Club. He also writes of R. Emmet O'Malley's removal as head of the state insurance commission and other concerns about the extent of corruption in state politics and elections, and expresses his belief that Stark might "wrest control of the state Democratic Party from the Pendergast-Shannon-Clark faction."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Charles L. Dunham to Jesse Barrett, detailing his knowledge of the workings of the Pendergast political machine in Kansas City, particularly as involves election and insurance fraud.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from U.S. Attorney Maurice Milligan to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, reporting on a discussion with the local Agent in Charge of the FBI about the possibility of election investigations in Missouri. Milligan makes suggestions for how to rebut accusations of allegiance, and then disloyalty, to the Pendergast machine.

Genre: 
Postcards

Anonymous postcard accusing Kansas City officials of misdeeds.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.