Milligan, Maurice M.

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Relationship of Ralph E. Truman and Olive L. Truman with Harry S. Truman: 1940 Senatorial Campaign

Essay documenting the role Ralph E. Truman and Olive L. Truman played in the 1940 U.S. Senatorial campaign in Missouri. Olive describes how Governor Lloyd C. Stark asked for Ralph's support for Stark's senatorial campaign, as Stark had recently appointed Ralph to a General. After Ralph put his support towards the reelection of his cousin Senator Harry S. Truman, Stark attempted to have Ralph's status as General revoked. In response, Ralph, Olive, and Bennett C. Clark resolved to get another Democratic candidate to enter to decrease Stark's chance of nomination.

Memorandum Covering Conference with Max Goldschein and Vincent Russo, Special United States Attorneys on May 15, 1950

Memorandum containing a statement from an unnamed former member of the Kansas City Board of Police Commissioners and his contacts with Charles Binaggio. He describes efforts by "the Binaggio political group" to remove him from the police board, and a meeting with Binaggio arranged by Herman Rosenberg, wherein Binaggio stated that he felt his group was due patronage and favors due to their support of Governor Smith's election.

Maurice M. Milligan for U.S. Senator

Pamphlet is support of Maurice M. Milligan for U.S. Senator of Missouri. Milligan ran in opposition to current Senator Harry S. Truman and lost the primary because the anti-Pendergast vote was split between Milligan and Lloyd C. Stark.

Maurice M. Milligan

Head and shoulders autographed portrait of Maurice M. Milligan, U.S. attorney who prosecuted Tom Pendergast.

Governor Stark and the Machine

Statement by a rival of Lloyd Stark in the 1936 Democratic primary for governor. The writer states "when I entered the gubernatorial contest my only hope was that I might help to arouse the people of our State against the infamy of the Pendergast machine," and was concerned about Stark's endorsement by the Pendergast machine. In light of Stark's work to clean up government and elections, however, he states "my attitude for the Governor's courage has become one of unstinted admiration."

Ghosts in the Heart of America

Pamphlet describing how Pendergast, "King of Kansas City, Emperor of Missouri," and his machine gained power in Kansas City and its role in statewide election fraud.

From William Ledbetter to Lloyd C. Stark

Letter from William M. Ledbetter to Lloyd C. Stark discussing the logistics of the upcoming campaign, including how much time Stark will spend at his home in Louisiana, the upcoming Missouri Press Association meeting and American Royal, and gossip about other potential candidates including William Hirth.

From William Hirth to Lloyd C. Stark

Letter from William Hirth to Governor Lloyd C. Stark discussing the prospect of Colonel Whitten as U.S. District Attorney and the candidacy of Maurice Milligan for Senate. Hirth writes that Whitten "is not only a man of outstanding ability, ... but from the long fight he has made against the machine in Kansas City, I think he is richly entitled to" the office.

From William Hirth to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from William Hirth, publisher and managing editor of The Missouri Farmer, to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on April 13, 1940, regarding concerns over the New Deal. Hirth also attempts to rally support for Lloyd C. Stark for his efforts in dismantling the Pendergast Machine.

From William Hirth to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from William Hirth, publisher and managing editor of The Missouri Farmer, to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 28, 1937. Hirth discusses Missouri politics ahead of the 1940 U.S. Senate campaign.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, May 17, 1940

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses the 1940 election and public reception to Maurice M. Milligan's campaign against Truman. Kitchen then details information he received concerning a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation of Andy Murphy and the Union Electric Company.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, May 14, 1936

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides supplementary information on investigation by Harvey L. Duncan concerning an alleged theft of an interstate shipment of liquor. Kitchen provides more intel on Duncan, his plans, and on John T. Burkett, a colleague of Duncan's that "is building a fire under him."