McElroy, Mary

Displaying 13 - 24 of 43
Genre: 
Clippings
Photographs

Clipping entitled "Detective Who Got Tip" from an article in Kansas City Journal-Post on June 3, 1933 documenting the kidnapping of Mary McElroy. The photograph's caption states, "R. K. Cole, one of the city detectives, who obtained the information leading to the arrest of the alleged kidnapers of Miss Mary McElroy, is shown here standing beside T. J. Higgins, chief of detectives, as he made his report. Inset shows A. H. Kessel, partner of Cole, who worked with him in obtaining the information."

Genre: 
Clippings
Photographs

Clipping entitled "Pet Rat to Holdover" from an article in Kansas City Journal-Post on June 3, 1933 documenting the kidnapping of Mary McElroy. The photograph's caption states, "Mrs. L. R. Gilbert, wife of one of the McElroy kidnap gang, insisted on taking her pet white rat with her when she was returned to Kansas City by airplane. She is shown here holding the pet while waiting to board the plane."

Genre: 
Clippings
Photographs

Clipping entitled "The Inevitable Error" from an article in Kansas City Journal-Post on June 3, 1933 documenting the kidnapping of Mary McElroy. The photograph's caption states, "Sooner or later every criminal does something to spoil the “perfect crime." This car, purchased by Walter H. McGee, leader of the McElroy kidnapers, in Amarillo proved to be the gang’s undoing. A telegram concerning the purchase was intercepted and gave officers the information that led to McGee arrest."

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a photo and article, continued on page 8, about "Dr. Schorer," a 54-year old pediatric physician appointed by Henry McElroy as the city's Director of Health, born in Wisconsin in 1881 and coming to Kansas City in 1913. Other featured articles include: “Politics and Hogs” (p. 2), about local hotels and restaurants selling their garbage to be used as hog feed and interference by the Kansas City Collection Company; “’S Not ‘N Eagle—‘S ‘N Owl” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. This issue includes a supplemental section coming out against a proposed permanent registration bill they argue “will only saddle us with vote fraud conditions even worse than in the past,” and reporting past voter fraud. Other featured articles include: “He Must Have Worried Terribly” (pp.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the Bond Advisory Committee of the Ten-Year Plan, made up of prominent Kansas Citians including R. Crosby Kemper and J. E. Woodmansee, and chaired by Conrad H. Mann. Other featured articles include: “The Sport of Kings” (p. 2), about the Riverside horse racing track and the machine-controlled gambling that takes place there; “Will They Be Able to Silence Mr. Bash?” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, with a photo and brief history of the Kansas City Municipal Airport (later called the Downtown Airport) "between North Kansas City and Kansas City proper," dedicated in 1927 and opened in 1929 with four airlines and reorganization after "cancellation of government mail contracts" in 1934. Other featured articles include: “Snapshots of the Week” (p.

Genre: 
Photographs

Photograph of Henry F. McElroy, Jr. and Mary McElroy with their father Henry F. McElroy, Sr. (left to right). The photograph was taken at the home H. F. McElroy, Sr., immediately following Mary's release from abduction at the Milburn Golf Club. This vantage point faces north towards the south entrance to St. Teresa's Academy across the street.

Genre: 
Photographs

Photograph of convicted kidnapper George McGee. The caption on the back of the image reads, "KC 212964... CHICAGO BUREAU, LIFE SENTENCE GIVEN GEORGE McGEE FOR McELROY KIDNAPING. George McGee, shown above on witness stand, was sentenced to life imprisonment for his part in the kidnaping of Miss Mary McElroy, daughter of the Kansas City, Mo. city manager, on May 27, from her home. Walter McGee, brother of George, the leader of the kidnap gang, has been condemned to die by hanging, the first such verdict to be returned in the United States in kidnap cases.

Genre: 
Photographs

Photograph of Ralph T. Harding, Lillie Knight, and Clarence Click (left to right) in the court room. The caption on the back of the image reads, "Watch your credit, International Chicago, 8817, 12-8-33, Charged with Kidnaping Mary McElroy: Clarence Click (right), discussing his case with Miss Lillie Knight, young woman attorney, who pleaded with a Kansas City jury not to send click to the gallows; at left is chief counsel for defense, Ralph T. Harding. Click is charged with kidnaping Miss Mary McElroy, daughter of City Manager H. F.

Genre: 
Photographs

Photograph of Ralph T. Harding, Walter McGee, John V. Hill, and Joseph B. Keenan (left to right) at the trial of Walter McGee. The caption on the back of the image reads, "STATE ASKS DEATH PENALTY FOR KIDNAPER, Photo shows the courtroom of Judge Allen C. Southern at Kansas City, Mo. During the trial of Walter McGee, who is charged with being the ringleader of the gang that kidnaped Mary McElroy, daughter of the City Manager of Kansas City, and held her till a ransom of $30,000 was paid left to right: Ralph T.

Genre: 
Photographs

Photograph of George McGee, Lillie Knight, and Ralph T. Harding (left to right) with R. H. Moore removed from the picture to the right. The caption on the back of the image reads, "Like in the case of his brother, Walter, the state has asked the death penalty for George McGee, youthful accused member of the gang which kidnaped Miss Mary McElroy, daughter of City Manager H. F. McElroy of Kansas City. Walter McGee was the first kidnaper ever given the death penalty in this country." George McGee is shown in this picture conferring with his three attorneys.

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