Mann, Conrad H.

Displaying 13 - 21 of 21
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Kansas City, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and his Jackson County Courthouse proposal to Conrad Mann, Henry F. McElroy, and Ruby Garrett.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Conrad H. Mann to Senator James A. Reed discussing the Depression and the need for the Charities Fund, and asserts that "it is a fact that as a whole our well-to-do have not carried their fair share of this responsibility" in the charity realm.

Genre: 
Broadsides

Broadside with a Q&A concerning the Ten-Year Plan. This document was disseminated in support of the propositions to be voted upon at the May 26, 1931 election. These propositions include numerous developments to public utilities and services.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

A report of the Executive Committee to the Civic Improvement Committee of Kansas City outlining a Ten-Year Improvement Program for Kansas City, Jackson County, and the School District of Kansas City. It details each proposed project with an estimated cost.

Genre: 
Photographs

Portrait photograph of Conrad H. Mann, chairman of the Chamber of Commerce and architect of the Ten Year Plan.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Kansas City Chamber of Commerce President Conrad H. Mann to Ralph F. Lozier. Mann reproduces a telegram to be sent to the House Conference Committee on Appropriation Bill for State, Commerce and Labor. The telegram is in support of the continued existence of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce office in Kansas City.

Genre: 
Clippings

A collection of newspaper article reproductions concerning Kansas City's Ten-Year Plan. Most of these Kansas City Star and Kansas City Times articles of 1929-1931 detail Conrad H. Mann's work with the Ten-Year Plan.

Author: 
Janice Lee

Between 1910 to 1939, nearly every major civic improvement in Kansas City bore the mark of Conrad Mann. This massive, bear-like man with a brusque, unpolished manner was a uniquely talented leader who knew how to "get things done."

Author: 
Dustin Gann
Midland University

According to a May 29, 1928, editorial in the Kansas Citian, the Republican National Convention promised to “bring more influential people in industry, business, and financial circles than ever brought here by a convention.” Local leaders envisioned the 1928 Republican National Convention raising the national and regional profile of Kansas City in two related ways. First, delegates and visitors attending the convention could see the city’s growth in person. Second, and perhaps more importantly, the event and subsequent attention would bolster the city’s standing, particularly in relation to regional rivals such as Cleveland and St. Louis.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.