Lewis, Milton C.

Displaying 13 - 24 of 29

From William Shaw to Dr. Milton C. Lewis

Letter from Musicians' Protective Union, Local 627 President William Shaw to Dr. Milton C. Lewis, President of the Council of Men's Clubs. Shaw on behalf of the Local No. 627 believe that despite the current depression, the current wages for musicians as set by the union are "not exhorbitant [sic]".

From the Dr. Milton C. Lewis to the Musicians' Protective Union, Local No. 627

Letter from the Council of Men's Clubs President Milton C. Lewis to the Musicians' Protective Union, Local No. 627, A. F. of M. Lewis on behalf of the Council of Men's Clubs believes the Local No. 627 should accept "a reduction in the price of Union Music, in conformity with the reduction of wages in other crafts."

From Otto P. Higgins to Dr. Milton C. Lewis

Letter from Kansas City, Missouri Department of Police Director Otto P. Higgins to Wayne Miner Post No. 149 Post Commander Dr. Milton C. Lewis. Higgins writes that he appreciates Lewis's letter concerning police officers Cavanaugh and Keleher.

From John J. Phelan to Dr. Milton C. Lewis

Letter from John J. Phelan to Dr. Milton C. Lewis, Commander of the American Legion, Wayne Miner Post No. 149, Kansas City, Missouri. Phelan informs Lewis that Dr. Louis H. Renfrow is endorsed as state commander for the American Legion. Phelan then provides a biography on Renfrow.

From Hannibal Hasting Hill, Jr. to Dr. Milton C. Lewis

Letter from Hannibal H. Hill, Jr. to Dr. Milton C. Lewis of the American Legion, Wayne Miner Post, No. 149. Hill provides an invoice for the nights he and his orchestra performed from March 10 through March 15, 1935. In this invoice Hill includes each member of the orchestra, their instrument, what nights they played, and how much money each are due. Hill claims that to date, he has not received nearly the amount owed for each performer.

From Dr. Milton C. Lewis to W. G. Mosely

Letter from Wayne Miner Post No. 149 Commander Milton C. Lewis to W. G. Mosely, President of the Out-State Democratic Club of Missouri. Lewis regrets that the Wayne Minor Post Drum and Bugle Corps will be unable to perform at Liberty Park in Sedalia, Missouri on August 4th and 5th, 1934 as they previously booked an engagement at Paola, Kansas.

From Dr. Milton C. Lewis to Unknown

A draft of a letter from Dr. Milton C. Lewis to an unknown recipient. Lewis informs this person of the purpose and mission of the Kansas City Council of Men's Clubs. He then provides what he believes to be the six duties of a Kansas City colored organization. Lewis then comments that those on the council are serious and hardworking men.

From Dr. Milton C. Lewis to Gil Burke

Letter from Kansas City Council of Men's Clubs President Dr. Milton C. Lewis to Missouri Representative Gil Burke. Lewis on behalf of the council thanks Burke for his efforts to prohibit lynching in Missouri. Lewis writes, "although your efforts may apparently seems without immediate results, the effects are being felt not only in Missouri, but throughout the country."

From Dr. Milton C. Lewis to Dwight Brown

Letter from Dr. Milton C. Lewis to Dwight Brown, President of Parole Board, Missouri State Penitentiary. Lewis believes that inmate Willie Smith's parole application should be considered favorably because of his good record before and during incarceration. He informs Brown that if approved, Smith would be under the care of Vincent Spizzuca of St. Louis, Missouri.

Forty-Fifth Annual Commencement, Lincoln High School

Program for the annual commencement of Lincoln High School, Kansas City, Missouri, held at the Junior College Auditorium on Friday, June 6, 1930.

Council of Men's Clubs Report

A report from Dr. Milton C. Lewis of the Council of Men's Clubs that details the organizational changes of various Kansas City men's clubs. Lewis then provides expense estimates used for promotion and includes an agenda for the men's clubs.

Council of Men's Clubs Program

Program for a Council of Men's Clubs event on March 14, 1931 at the Elks Rest in the Lincoln Building. After an opening statement by Dr. Milton C. Lewis, the program includes musical numbers and games.