Kitchen, William A.

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Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen describes in detail an investigation by Harvey L. Duncan concerning an alleged theft of an interstate shipment of liquor. Kitchen warns against a conspiracy charge, which would reflect poorly on the Kansas City organization.

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses a number of Missouri political matters including possible state chairman replacements. He also provides intelligence concerning a secret political meeting held in the Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri. In attendance were Lloyd C. Stark, J. D. James, William E.

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman informs Kitchen that he recommended Mrs. Gene Warner for a position with the Commodity Credit Corporation.

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman responds to Kitchen suggestion that President Roosevelt attends the 1935 American Legion National Convention in St. Louis. Truman agrees that it would be wise for the President to attend and will try to convince him to do so.

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses the matter of a new Judge for the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Kitchen asserts that the court needs a judge from Missouri as it does not currently have a Missouri judge that can devote their time to hearing cases.

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen requests Truman's help in confirming his sister, Elizabeth Kitchen Black, as Postmaster of Mound City, Missouri. Kitchen also requests an autographed portrait of Truman for Kitchen to hang in his office.

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman thanks Kitchen for state committee suggestions. In the postscript, Truman writes in longhand: "Can't thank you enough for your help in campaign."

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen shares his on Robert Walton's sentiment concerning the Missouri Democratic Party. They believe the party in Missouri looks to Truman to save and reorganize it ahead of the 1942 election.

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen encourages Truman to give K. E. Long of Newburg, Missouri a job under Mr. Murray. Kitchen finds Long to be "well connected politically in Phelps County and I am, therefore, extremely anxious that he be placed on the payroll at the earliest possible date."

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman makes a request of Kitchen. He asks him to talk with General Joe Keenan when Keenan visits Kansas City on May 14, 1938. During this visit, Truman requests Kitchen to mention Fred Canfill as an excellent pick for U.S. Marshall at Kansas City.

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen suggests a way in which Truman can put in a replacement for Maurice M. Milligan as U.S. attorney at Kansas City.

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen informs Truman that he spoke with Col. Bob Walton of Armstrong, Missouri. After explaining Truman's side of the story concerning the WPA issue, Kitchen reports that Walton agrees with Truman, but is still worried about the Democratic party in the 1940 campaign.

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