Higgins, Otto P.

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Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, describing the inequality of property tax assessments throughout Jackson County and other costs of homeownership. Other featured articles include: “He Beats the Rap but You Take It” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 4 and 8, about the "anti-machine speech" by Missouri state representative J. A. Gray broadcast "over station WOS in Jefferson City," Missouri, cut off in mid-transmission after scathing indictments of Tom Pendergast, with a copy of the speech in full. Other featured articles include: “Lunch-hooks Out of the Cookie Jar” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, with a photo and brief history of the Kansas City Municipal Airport (later called the Downtown Airport) "between North Kansas City and Kansas City proper," dedicated in 1927 and opened in 1929 with four airlines and reorganization after "cancellation of government mail contracts" in 1934. Other featured articles include: “Snapshots of the Week” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, discussing the difficulty of accessing city records for citizens or reporters. Other featured articles include: “Snapshots” (p. 1), with quick items that include Nell Donnelly Reed having been rated fourth in a list of the most prominent business women in the country; “Seven Eleven” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a notice that Future’s publishers plan to temporarily suspend publication to reorganize the paper, and also note that “youth is interested and youth is organizing,” and “FUTURE is their paper.” Other featured articles include: “Why Charge a Cover?” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

First issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a statement on the newspaper's objective, maintaining that the newspaper is not against any certain political party or vice, but that it is simply for "good government". Featured articles include: “Council Passes Cab Ordinance” (pp. 2 & 4) discussing councilman Frank H. Backstrom’s reaction to the ordinance and detailing other ordinances appropriating bond funds.; "Adult Education--A Fine Work" (pp.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about crime in Kansas City, the lack of accurate, trustworthy records about its frequency and location, and the city’s “inefficient, politically-controlled police department.” Other featured articles include: “Mister Welching” (p.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Chester C. Smith, president of the Kansas City Power and Light Company, regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Smith writes that he believes Higgins "has been and ... can still be a very useful citizen in the community," and asks that "he be permitted to return to start his life again." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Tom L. Evans, president of Crown Drug Company, regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Evans writes of Higgins' accomplishments with the police department and Kansas City Safety Council, and states that he believes Higgins "has learned his lesson" and would be able to "completely rehabilitate himself" as a citizen. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Eddie Meisburger, state editor of the Kansas City Journal, regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Meisburger writes of Higgins' experience as a war correspondent for the Kansas City Star, his later law career, and that when he became director of the Kansas City Police department, "he little knew or desired the pitfalls it would open for him." Higgins was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Parole progress report for Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, which includes testing results, a mention of his "super intelligence" and "excellent personality," his "fair general health," and a note that he "wishes whole-heartedly that he had never become involved in politics." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from G. R. Watson regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Watson, a neighbor of the Higgins family, writes with compliments for the whole family, and saying that good and moral children could only come from "parents [who] are good citizens and good people." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

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KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.