Higgins, Otto P.

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Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a photo and article, continued on page 8, about "Dr. Schorer," a 54-year old pediatric physician appointed by Henry McElroy as the city's Director of Health, born in Wisconsin in 1881 and coming to Kansas City in 1913. Other featured articles include: “Politics and Hogs” (p. 2), about local hotels and restaurants selling their garbage to be used as hog feed and interference by the Kansas City Collection Company; “’S Not ‘N Eagle—‘S ‘N Owl” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about President Franklin D. Roosevelt and “Tommy Wommy” Pendergast’s insistence on standing by the president, as well as other local leaders such as Truman and Shannon’s diplomatic efforts with the federal government. Portraits of of FDR and Pendergast are included. Other featured articles include: “Little Merchants” (p. 2), about children employed to sell magazines being exempt from state child labor laws; “President’s Birthday Funds (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a photo and article, continued on page 8, about the cleanliness and purity of Kansas City’s milk supply and how to regulate that industry. Other featured articles include: “Fanfaronade” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the “lug,” “an involuntary or forced contribution to something a luckless employee isn’t nearly as interested in” as his and his family’s own welfare. Other featured articles include “T. J. and W. T.” (page 2), about patching up of differences between William Kemper, Sr. ("Democratic national committeeman for Missouri") and Tom Pendergast (Democratic No.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 3 and 8, about the selling of merchandise stolen from Kansas merchants in Kansas City pawn shops, and description of the subsequent closing of small shops not tied to the Pendergast machine and sentencing of a black man to 40 years in jail in lieu of convicting the proprietor of a guilty shop at 9th and Main Streets, and other issues. Other featured articles include: “Fame!” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the Bond Advisory Committee of the Ten-Year Plan, made up of prominent Kansas Citians including R. Crosby Kemper and J. E. Woodmansee, and chaired by Conrad H. Mann. Other featured articles include: “The Sport of Kings” (p. 2), about the Riverside horse racing track and the machine-controlled gambling that takes place there; “Will They Be Able to Silence Mr. Bash?” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the escape from federal police in Kansas City of Sam Randazzo, "a St. Louis gangster" being released from Leavenworth, with the help of police officials Otto Higgins and Jeff Rayen. Other featured articles include: “Patriots Go to Riverside” (p.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Kansas City, Kansas, postermaster A. H. Gillis regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Gillis writes that he has known Higgins since boyhood and that he will "make a comeback to citizenship" if paroled, and that his family has been "victims of untold suffering and humiliation" for his first offense. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from G. M. Burns, director of the Kansas City Safety Council, regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Burns writes of Higgins' good work as director of the police department, particularly noting his achievements in greater traffic safety, increased training for officers, and reducing juvenile delinquency. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Prison record of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, which includes sentencing dates and terms as well as work and cell assignments. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Herbert Corey regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Corey writes that, while Higgins was undoubtedly guilty as charged, "he is not a criminal at heart," and "was the perfect victim for a political machine," describing him as "a stumbling, jovial, well meaning man who was able to do some good for his city." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from attorney J. Frank Flynn regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Flynn writes that he has known Higgins since they were law school students, and states that he "associated with respectable people and had a good reputation." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.