Floyd, Charles (Pretty Boy)

Displaying 13 - 17 of 17
Genre: 
Photographs

Mug shot of Charles Arthur “Pretty Boy” Floyd, used as an exhibit against the defendant in Criminal Case No. 35160: State of Missouri vs. Adam Richetti. The state alleged that "that appellant [Richetti] with two notorious criminals "Pretty Boy" Floyd and Verne Miller, perpetrated the massacre in the attempted execution of a conspiracy to liberate convict Nash."

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Court Opinion by Judge George R. Ellison for Criminal Case No. 35160: State of Missouri vs. Adam Richetti, Appellant. Upon reviewing the assignments of error in Richetti's motion for a new trial, Ellison affirms that Richetti was guilty of murdering Frank Hermanson on June 17, 1933 as part of the Union Station Massacre. Ellison further affirms Richetti's death penalty and orders its administration with lethal gas, at the Missouri State Penitentiary in Jefferson City, Missouri.

Genre: 
Photographs

Mug shot of Charles Arthur “Pretty Boy” Floyd, used as an exhibit against the defendant in Criminal Case No. 35160: State of Missouri vs. Adam Richetti. The state alleged that "that appellant [Richetti] with two notorious criminals "Pretty Boy" Floyd and Verne Miller, perpetrated the massacre in the attempted execution of a conspiracy to liberate convict Nash."

Genre: 
Photographs

Wide shot of Kansas City Massacre aftermath. This event, also known as the Union Station Massacre, saw the deaths of Frank Nash, an Oklahoma train and bank robber; William J. Grooms, a Kansas City police officer; Frank E. Hermanson, another Kansas City police officer; Raymond J. Caffrey, an FBI specialist; and Otto Reed, the chief of police for McAlester, Oklahoma. Outlaws Vernon Miller, Charles (Pretty Boy) Floyd, and Adam Richetti were attempting to free Frank Nash from law enforcement custody.

Union Station
Author: 
Jason Roe
Kansas City Public Library

On June 17, 1933, four law enforcement officers and their prisoner, Frank Nash, were fatally wounded in a botched rescue attempt outside Union Station. The story of the Union Station Massacre, as it became known, centered on Frank Nash, who had been convicted of three separate crimes of a serious nature: murder, armed burglary, and then assault.

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