Cochran, John J.

Displaying 13 - 19 of 19
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Clarence Cannon updating Lloyd Stark on his interactions regarding his candidacy for governor. He reports that Duke Shoop from the Kansas City Star "said that no man from either Kansas City or St. Louis could be elected ... the next Governor would come from the country."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter updating Lloyd Stark on his interactions regarding his candidacy for governor. Copy of document SHSMO-C0004-F08102-0001.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman to Guy B. Park reporting that some state employees say that they like Truman but will vote for Cochran and asking for Park for help increase his support.

Genre: 
Pamphlets

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He asserts "[t]he first nomination for United States Senator of Harry S. Truman was stolen," and proceeds to argue that point. The Pendergast machine is described as "the most corrupt, the most brazen, gang of thieves who ever looted an American city," and describes the Pendergasts' businesses' activities and obstructions around the city.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Robert A. Glenn to Lloyd C. Stark writing about the view of the governors race from St. Louis and what issues may await him during the campaign.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to his two sons, Ralph F. Lozier, Jr. and Lue C. Lozier. Lozier discusses the viability of Harry S. Truman, John J. Cochran, and Jacob L. "Tuck" Milligan as Democratic candidates for U.S. Senator in Missouri. He comments that Truman, "is without experience and training in subjects that a Senator is supposed to know something about."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Telegram from Ralph F. Lozier to Charles M. Howell. After polling rural Missouri counties, Lozier rules that Truman would come in last place behind John J. Cochran and Jacob L. "Tuck" Milligan as Democratic candidate for U.S. Senator. Lozier believes that if he ran, "a very substantial majority of rural Democrats" would support him and Truman would withdraw. Thus, he inquires what candidate Pendergast would support if Truman withdraws.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.