Clark, Bennett C.

Displaying 73 - 84 of 135

From J. W. Thompson to Lloyd C. Stark

Letter from J. W. Thompson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark concerning social security pensions and Thompson's view of Missouri politicians. He admits he does not like Bennett C. Clark, but as an anti-Pendergast voter, Thompson believes "Clark is better than Truman at his best."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, September 25, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on the political maneuvering of Maurice M. Milligan and Bennett C. Clark and mentions that "Then Canfil came in with a whole string of trouble which I got straightened out to some extent and now John Madden and R.R. Brewster are here on a parole for Pendergast."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, October 27, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his endeavor to select the new Kansas City W.P.A. Director and then comments about those affiliated with the Pendergast machine: "Mr. [Matthew S.] Murray, Mr. [Henry F.] McElroy, Mr. [Otto P.] Higgins, and even Mr. [Tom] P. himself probably would pay all the ill-gotten loot they took for my position and clear conscience."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, October 25, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his latest political maneuvers with Bennett C. Clark: "Mr. Clark and I have had a time trying to get to the W.P.A. office to recommend a man for [Matthew S.] Murray's place. It looks as if they would really put poor old Murray in the jug."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, November 28, 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides some candid information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "…[Bennett C.] Clark has definitely lined up with the Boss [Tom Pendergast] you see. He and Maurice Milligan almost came to blows the last time they met and now the Pres and [Lloyd C.] Stark are thinking of running him for Senator against Clark."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, November 22, 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides the latest information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "I missed a call from [Joseph B.] Shannon... Jim P. [Pendergast] said he hoped I'd keep him here but I'm glad he's going home. He says [Lloyd C.] Stark will run against [Bennett C.] Clark and not against me."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, March 10, 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of a growing rift between Truman and Bennett C. Clark: "Bennett, I suppose will be in Kansas City Saturday. I told him if he was looking for a split in the Democratic Party he could very easily find it and perhaps now is as good a time as any to have it."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, June 28, 1936

Letter from Harry S. Truman at The Majestic in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman gives Bess his opinion of the 1936 Democratic National Convention and mentions that James M. Pendergast was present. He also makes note that the date marks his seventeenth anniversary with Bess.

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, June 25, 1936

Letter from Harry S. Truman at The Majestic in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. Written while Truman was attending the 1936 Democratic National Convention, Truman comments on several small details concerning the convention, including the fact that "Mrs. [Bennett C.] Clark was there and sat with the delegation--quite a concession as she had a box seat on the stage. I was given one for you but gave it to T.J. [Tom Pendergast]."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, June 19, 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman tells Bess of his meeting with President Roosevelt, Bennett C. Clark, and Clarence Cannon concerning relief for flood victims. Truman adds that, "I had a chance to tell Mr. Roosevelt what I thought of Mr. Mitchell. He very readily agreed with me."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, July 29, 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this candid letter, Truman updates Bess on his meeting with Tom Pendergast in New York, saying that "Pendergast was as pleased to see me as if I'd been young Jim. We talked for three hours about everything under the sun. Discarded a couple of prominent candidates for governor..."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, July 28, 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel New Yorker in New York City to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this candid letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel to New York to meet with Tom Pendergast and provides an explanation for his visit: "Charlie Howell was in to see me and I wanted to get to the boss first so that's why I'm here. He... wanted to announce for governor when he gets back. That'll split Clark and T.J. sure I believe."