Clark, Bennett C.

Displaying 49 - 60 of 139
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his visit with Franklin D. Roosevelt and their discussion about Lloyd C. Stark: "Went to see the President about a bill and he insisted on talking Mo. politics and telling me what a funny Governor we have. He didn't say phony but that's what he meant."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at The Majestic in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman gives Bess his opinion of the 1936 Democratic National Convention and mentions that James M. Pendergast was present. He also makes note that the date marks his seventeenth anniversary with Bess.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses a number of Missouri political matters including possible state chairman replacements. He also provides intelligence concerning a secret political meeting held in the Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri. In attendance were Lloyd C. Stark, J. D. James, William E. Kemp, Edgar Shook, Andrew Murphy, et al..

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides details on Clark and Truman's political maneuvering: "Clark said he was to see Tuck [Jacob] Milligan yesterday and that he'd rub a little salt on Stark. He thinks maybe we can get 'em all in the race."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this particularly candid letter, Truman updates Bess on the politics of Missouri and the nation, saying that "Pendergast hasn't made up his mind yet who will be governor. He'll announce it sometime soon. If the man is smart and politically minded he can say who Clark's successor will be and can deliver the 1940 delegation at the national convention."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of a growing rift between Truman and Bennett C. Clark: "Bennett, I suppose will be in Kansas City Saturday. I told him if he was looking for a split in the Democratic Party he could very easily find it and perhaps now is as good a time as any to have it."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter that identifies two Missouri officials whose activities are troubling to the author.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Walker C. Johnson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, expressing happiness at James Douglas winning the Missouri Supreme Court election, but describing further corruption to be eliminated in his county and WPA. He describes a WPA foreman that other workers call "Little Tom" passing out campaign information for Billings in advance of the election.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Charles L. Dunham to Jesse Barrett describing his political activities over the years and his opposition to the Pendergast Machine in Kansas City.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Congressman Clarence Cannon to Lloyd C. Stark, relating a conversaion with Rufus Jackson about who Pendergast and the Missouri Democrats were opting to support in the upcoming gubernatorial race.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 26, 1934. Foree reports on John J. Cochran's political meeting in St. Louis of the previous evening and on Cochran's projected polling in St. Louis. He recounts, "They are claiming 10 to 1 of all the combined votes of [Jacob L.] Milligan and [Harry S.] Truman in the city." Foree also mentions that Cochran recently traveled to Kansas City to meet with Thomas J. Pendergast.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Mrs. Louis M. Wilson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark prior to his election as Missouri governor, providing advice about his 1936 campaign. Regarding the Pendergast machine, she advises "you have to have them to win."

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY