Clark, Bennett C.

Displaying 49 - 60 of 139
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this particularly candid letter, Truman updates Bess on the politics of Missouri and the nation, saying that "Pendergast hasn't made up his mind yet who will be governor. He'll announce it sometime soon. If the man is smart and politically minded he can say who Clark's successor will be and can deliver the 1940 delegation at the national convention."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of a growing rift between Truman and Bennett C. Clark: "Bennett, I suppose will be in Kansas City Saturday. I told him if he was looking for a split in the Democratic Party he could very easily find it and perhaps now is as good a time as any to have it."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen describes in detail an investigation by Harvey L. Duncan concerning an alleged theft of an interstate shipment of liquor. Kitchen warns against a conspiracy charge, which would reflect poorly on the Kansas City organization. Thus, he suggests that any suspect be tried separately, and not as co-conspirators in a large scheme. In order to do this, Kitchen recommends Truman has Bennett C. Clark call Maurice M. Milligan and request that Milligan prosecutes violators separately.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his recent meetings in which he has "been politicking around among the Senators and Congressmen, distributing a little hooch where it would do the most good, and trying to find out what they think of Bennett Champ Clark for President."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides some candid information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "…[Bennett C.] Clark has definitely lined up with the Boss [Tom Pendergast] you see. He and Maurice Milligan almost came to blows the last time they met and now the Pres and [Lloyd C.] Stark are thinking of running him for Senator against Clark."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Pickwick Hotel in Kansas City, Missouri to his wife Bess in Buena Vista, Colorado. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his return to Kansas City and his speech there. Of his associates, he noted that "Mr. [Bennett C.] Clark accepted but failed to appear as usual. Told Jim P. [Pendergast] he'd be in this afternoon but didn't come."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Glidewell to Governor Stark encouraging him to consider running in the upcoming 1940 presidential election.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Text of a speech given by Jesse Barrett at the Annual Reunion of Montgomery County Old Settlers, 1938

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Walker C. Johnson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, lauding Stark for his "stand for RIGHT in the State of M[issouri]." He writes that many of his county opposed Stark due to his Pendergast support, but that now "most of them are behind you on this [war] to rid the State of the rascals in elections." He also describes losing his job due to political affiliation.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Katherine W. Halterman. Lozier informs Katherine that in the event Charles M. Howell did not run for Senate, T. J. Pendergast said that he would support Lozier in his campaign for the Senate. He then provides an analysis of the Missouri campaign for U.S. Senate, concluding that, "No Kansas City man can be nominated."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from A. Ross Hill to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on July 18, 1934. Hill reports from Kansas City on a Jacob L. Milligan campaign event, the aftermath of John Lazia's death, and campaign speeches against Harry S. Truman.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Robert Locke, Kansas City Journal-Post science editor, to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, requesting Stark's approval to start a "Stark for President" Club. He also writes of R. Emmet O'Malley's removal as head of the state insurance commission and other concerns about the extent of corruption in state politics and elections, and expresses his belief that Stark might "wrest control of the state Democratic Party from the Pendergast-Shannon-Clark faction."

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.