Clark, Bennett C.

Displaying 37 - 48 of 139
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his visit with Franklin D. Roosevelt and their discussion about Lloyd C. Stark: "Went to see the President about a bill and he insisted on talking Mo. politics and telling me what a funny Governor we have. He didn't say phony but that's what he meant."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at The Majestic in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman gives Bess his opinion of the 1936 Democratic National Convention and mentions that James M. Pendergast was present. He also makes note that the date marks his seventeenth anniversary with Bess.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses a number of Missouri political matters including possible state chairman replacements. He also provides intelligence concerning a secret political meeting held in the Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri. In attendance were Lloyd C. Stark, J. D. James, William E. Kemp, Edgar Shook, Andrew Murphy, et al..

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides details on Clark and Truman's political maneuvering: "Clark said he was to see Tuck [Jacob] Milligan yesterday and that he'd rub a little salt on Stark. He thinks maybe we can get 'em all in the race."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this particularly candid letter, Truman updates Bess on the politics of Missouri and the nation, saying that "Pendergast hasn't made up his mind yet who will be governor. He'll announce it sometime soon. If the man is smart and politically minded he can say who Clark's successor will be and can deliver the 1940 delegation at the national convention."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of a growing rift between Truman and Bennett C. Clark: "Bennett, I suppose will be in Kansas City Saturday. I told him if he was looking for a split in the Democratic Party he could very easily find it and perhaps now is as good a time as any to have it."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen describes in detail an investigation by Harvey L. Duncan concerning an alleged theft of an interstate shipment of liquor. Kitchen warns against a conspiracy charge, which would reflect poorly on the Kansas City organization. Thus, he suggests that any suspect be tried separately, and not as co-conspirators in a large scheme. In order to do this, Kitchen recommends Truman has Bennett C. Clark call Maurice M. Milligan and request that Milligan prosecutes violators separately.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his recent meetings in which he has "been politicking around among the Senators and Congressmen, distributing a little hooch where it would do the most good, and trying to find out what they think of Bennett Champ Clark for President."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides some candid information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "…[Bennett C.] Clark has definitely lined up with the Boss [Tom Pendergast] you see. He and Maurice Milligan almost came to blows the last time they met and now the Pres and [Lloyd C.] Stark are thinking of running him for Senator against Clark."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Pickwick Hotel in Kansas City, Missouri to his wife Bess in Buena Vista, Colorado. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his return to Kansas City and his speech there. Of his associates, he noted that "Mr. [Bennett C.] Clark accepted but failed to appear as usual. Told Jim P. [Pendergast] he'd be in this afternoon but didn't come."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses the matter of a new Judge for the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Kitchen asserts that the court needs a judge from Missouri as it does not currently have a Missouri judge that can devote their time to hearing cases. Kitchen then recommends Charlie Carr for the position and asks Truman to pass this recommendation on to Bennett C. Clark and President Roosevelt.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and upcoming travel plans. He then candidly comments that "Pendergast wants to see me and Clark and I'm of the opinion that everything will be settled when we see him. Wouldn't the papers give something to know that?"

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.