Clark, Bennett C.

Displaying 25 - 36 of 139
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses the matter of a new Judge for the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Kitchen asserts that the court needs a judge from Missouri as it does not currently have a Missouri judge that can devote their time to hearing cases. Kitchen then recommends Charlie Carr for the position and asks Truman to pass this recommendation on to Bennett C. Clark and President Roosevelt.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and upcoming travel plans. He then candidly comments that "Pendergast wants to see me and Clark and I'm of the opinion that everything will be settled when we see him. Wouldn't the papers give something to know that?"

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on the political maneuvering of Maurice M. Milligan and Bennett C. Clark and mentions that "Then Canfil came in with a whole string of trouble which I got straightened out to some extent and now John Madden and R.R. Brewster are here on a parole for Pendergast."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his endeavor to select the new Kansas City W.P.A. Director and then comments about those affiliated with the Pendergast machine: "Mr. [Matthew S.] Murray, Mr. [Henry F.] McElroy, Mr. [Otto P.] Higgins, and even Mr. [Tom] P. himself probably would pay all the ill-gotten loot they took for my position and clear conscience."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Willard Hotel in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and on his new prospects, saying that, "Tomorrow I'm to see Senator Clark and Mr. Burr and the rest and really make up my mind on what I'm to do."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this candid letter, Truman informs Bess that he intends to travel in secret to New York to meet with Tom Pendergast.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this candid letter, Truman updates Bess on his meeting with Tom Pendergast in New York, saying that "Pendergast was as pleased to see me as if I'd been young Jim. We talked for three hours about everything under the sun. Discarded a couple of prominent candidates for governor..."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides the latest information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "I missed a call from [Joseph B.] Shannon... Jim P. [Pendergast] said he hoped I'd keep him here but I'm glad he's going home. He says [Lloyd C.] Stark will run against [Bennett C.] Clark and not against me."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen warns that Democrats might have a difficult election in 1940 because of recent events in Congress. Kitchen suggests that Truman address some of these issues ahead of the 1940 campaign. Included is a reproduction of an article from the Armstrong Herald on February 16, 1939.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses new developments on the appointment of a new judge for the Eight Circuit Court of Appeals. Kitchen inquires what might be happening in the Department of Justice concerning this appointment.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen concedes that it is not yet time to reorganize the Missouri Democratic Party. Kitchen then provides intelligence concerning Lloyd C. Stark and the recent Women's Democratic Clubs convention in Jefferson City, Missouri. He then discusses a proposed Democratic "harmony" dinner in Jefferson City and mentions Jim Aylward's recent comments towards Truman.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of some political maneuvering involving Bennett C. Clark, saying that "It would have been taken for an obvious attempt on my part to keep him and the St. Louis gang from the Gov. and I don't want to do that."

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.