Bluford, Lucile H.

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Bluford vs. Canada, Civil Action No. 42: Bill of Court Costs

Bill of court costs in Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada, listing clerk's costs, statutory attorney fee, witness fees, and marshal's fee, to be reimbursed. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Bluford vs. Canada, Civil Action No. 42: Amendment to Complaint

Amendment to complaint in Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada. The plaintiff's attorneys amend Bluford's original complaint by adding text to provide that Bluford knew that Lincoln University did not offer graduate or undergraduate work in journalism. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Bluford vs. Canada, Civil Action No. 42: Amendment to Amended Second Complaint

Amendment to amended second complaint in Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada.

Bluford vs. Canada, Civil Action No. 42: Amended Second Count in Complaint for Deprivation of Plaintiff's Civil Rights under Color of State Laws

Amended second count in complaint for deprivation of plaintiff's civil rights under color of state laws in Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada, adding information to Bluford's initial complaint. The document summarizes her case against Canada, the registrar of the University of Missouri, and asserts her rights under the equal protection cause of the Constitution were violated by his rejection of her application for admission.

Bluford vs. Canada, Civil Action No. 42: Amended Motion for New Trial

Amended motion for new trial in Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada, wherein Bluford's attorney Charles Houston moves to set aside the verdict and grant her a new trial. He argues that the original verdict was invalid due to an illegally assembled all-white jury, that a witness was allowed to testify that Lincoln University could have created a journalism department by Fall 1939 without any demonstrated knowledge of the logistics of doing so, and by excluding evidence that Bluford did contact Lincoln University regarding graduate work, among other factors.

Bluford vs. Canada, Civil Action No. 42: Affidavit of Robert S. Cobb in support of Challenge to Panel

Affidavit of Robert S. Cobb in support of challenge to panel in Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada. Cobb, an attorney in Jefferson City, attests that he knows "both from his personal knowledge and general community reputation that Negroes have not been called for jury service in [the U.S.

Bluford vs. Canada, Civil Action No. 42: Affidavit of Lucile Bluford supporting Challenge to Panel

Affidavit of Lucile Bluford supporting challenge to panel in Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada. Bluford and her attorneys provided support to her challenge that black citizens were illegally removed from the jury pool for her trial, resulting in an all white jury panel. This document provides population statistics for the Missouri counties from which her jury was selected, including population data for each race.

Bluford vs. Canada, Civil Action No. 42: Affidavit of Duke Diggs supporting Challenge to Panel

Affidavit of Duke Diggs supporting challenge to panel in Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada. Duke Diggs, a resident of Jefferson City, attests that "both from his own personal knowledge and from the general reputation of the community [he] knows that Negroes have never been called to serve as jurors" in the U.S. District Court for the Central Division of the Western District of Missouri in at least 50 years.

Bluford vs. Canada, Civil Action No. 128: Verdict

Verdict in Civil Case No. 128: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada. Jury foreman Charles E. Abbott announces the jury finds against the plaintiff and for the defendant. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Bluford vs. Canada, Civil Action No. 128: Thelma Berlack Boozer Civil Subpena

Civil subpoena issued in Civil Case No. 128: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada to Thelma Berlack Boozer of Lincoln University. She is commanded to appear in District Court on April 23, 1942, as a witness for the plaintiff. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Bluford vs. Canada, Civil Action No. 128: Telegram from Federal Court Clerk to William S. Hogsett

Telegram from the federal court clerk to defense attorney William S. Hogsett in Civil Case No. 128: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada, writing that Judge John C. Collet directs a Bluford motion to be continued from Saturday to an undecided future date. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Bluford vs. Canada, Civil Action No. 128: Summons for S. W. Canada

Summons in Civil Case No. 128: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada issued to defendant Canada, ordering a response to plaintiff's attorney Carl R. Johnson within 20 days. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.