Billings, James V.

Displaying 1 - 12 of 60
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ellison Neel to Wallace I.

Genre: 
Programs

Program for the Silver Jubilee of St. Stanislaus Parish, a Polish congregation at the northeast corner of 18th Street and Ewing Avenue near Blue River. Included are portraits of local clergy including Thomas F. Lillis and Rev. A. F. Radwich; photographs and history of the parish; event details; and advertisements. Notable political figures paying their compliments include Thomas J. Pendergast, Bryce B. Smith, H. F. McElroy, and James V. "Josh" Billings.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from John T. Harding to L. H. Forman, discussing anti-Clark/Douglas circulars being "thrown into the river" in St. Louis.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Floyd C. Sperry, James Billings' campaign manager, addressed to "My dear Friend." Sperry writes that he has enclosed evidence that the Missouri State Board of Nurse Examiners and the State Board of Health are being coerced by Stark into support James Douglas in the Missouri Supreme Court race.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Governor Lloyd C. Stark to the headquarters of James Douglas' campaign for Missouri Supreme Court, asking them to look into whether Anna Watson of Marceline is working for the Billings campaign, as she said she was obligated to Tom Pendergast.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from David M. Proctor to Judge James V. Billings, in response to Billings' solicitation of support. Proctor writes that, in spite of warm personal feelings, he cannot support Billings for two reasons: one, he is a Republican, and second, due to his sponsorship by the Pendergast machine.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter signed "A friend" to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing specific incidents of fraud in the 1938 primary election.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Garrett E. Spitzer to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, congratulation Stark on Judge James Douglas' win in the Missouri Supreme Court election, but writes that "while it may sound the death knell of Boss Pendergast, ... I wish to say that Pendergast is not dead by any manner of means. He has only received a severe slap."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Horace Merritt to Governor Lloyd Stark, discussing opposition to Stark for his mission to clean up "old age pension lists" and how that is effecting support for James Douglas in the Missouri Supreme Court campaign, as well as other campaign related issues. Merritt writes that he does not believe Stark "thought for a minute that the Security Commission would remove helpless and worthy pensioners."

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

The Footman newsletter, containing an article by William Hirth for Missouri Ruralist entitled "Hirth Supports Judge Douglas," a recap of a meeting of the Democratic Equal Rights Club. The paper endorses James V. Billings for Missouri Supreme Court.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Franklin J. Creagan to E. J. McMahon, supervisor at the Missouri Department of Liquor Control, reporting that James Douglas is gaining popularity in the state Supreme Court race in Pettis County, and that he is ahead in Morgan and Benton Counties. Creagan writes that Saline County is up for grabs, but that Douglas is gaining votes.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from J. T. Pinnell to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, reporting that Democratic county officials in southwest Missouri are under Pendergast machine control and that the "office holders have Mr. Billings' picture set up in their offices." Pinnell writes that he believes that there are many "decent, patriotic men and women" who are not allied with Pendergast, "but the trouble is that they are not organized at all, and consequently, will not be able to make their force felt." He also describes machine influence with relief organizations in the region.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.