Aylward, James P.

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Truman with Tom Pendergast and others

Senator Harry S. Truman, Thomas J. Pendergast, James P. Aylward, James Farley, N. G. Robertson, and David Fitzgerald at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

To the Members of the Woman's Benefit Association

Letter from May Sommers, State Field Director of the Women's Benefit Association, informing members about a lawsuit brought against their society and other fraternal organizations in Missouri.

To Democrats of the Seventh Precinct Seventh Ward

Mailing to Kansas City Democratic voters, encouraging them to turn out early and vote for Lloyd C. Stark for Governor and Ernest S. Gantt for Supreme Court Judge of Missouri.

Telegram from Charles M. Hay to Lloyd C. Stark

Telegram from Charles M. Hay to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, on the issue of Jim Aylward for state Democratic Party chairman. He writes "in my opinion it would be grievous mistake for you to consent to Ayleward [sic] or any other Pendergast afficiliate [sic] for state chairman."

Sample Ballot for General Election on Tuesday, March 27, 1934

Small card to be used by voters to instruct them which candidates to vote for in the municipal election on Tuesday, March 27, 1934. This Democratic ticket was issued by the Democratic County Committee.

Sailor Maids Program

Program for "Sailor Maids", a musical comedy in two acts by Charles Ross Chaney and presented by the St. Agnes Academy Departments of Music, Expression and Dancing at the Missouri Theatre on May 25, 1928. Notable political figures paying compliments include Miles Bulger, Conrad H. Mann, Walsh-Aylward, and Thomas J. Pendergast.

Relationship of Ralph E. Truman and Olive L. Truman with Harry S. Truman: 1934 Senatorial Campaign

Essay documenting the role Ralph E. Truman and Olive L. Truman played in the 1934 U.S. Senatorial campaign in Missouri. Olive details how her and her husband helped Jacob L. Milligan with his campaign before learning that Ralph's cousin Harry S. Truman would enter as well. The two had committed themselves to the Milligan campaign and could not aid Harry. Olive also details tactics used by the Pendergast Organization during this campaign.

Memorandum Regarding Stark Campaign

Memoradum discussing plans for Lloyd Stark's gubernatorial campaign. It notes the importance of announcing the Pendergast endorsement quickly and openly "to prevent, as far as possible, a 'reconsideration' later." It also discusses plans for establishing Stark-for-Governor clubs throughout the state, establishing patronage, finance and executive committees, and how to deal with the likely anti-Pendergast movement.

Memo from Margaret Carr to Mr. Forman

Office memo from Margaret Carr to Mr. Forman, with the subject line indicating the content is "confidential information from Mr. Harnsbarger." The memo reports that Dick Nacy intends to run for state chairman, and that he will likely receive the support of the Pendergast machine if Jim Aylward opts out.

Letter from R. Emmet O'Malley to Robert E. Hannegan

Letter from R. Emmet O'Malley, director of the Kansas City Water Department, to Robert E. Hannegan, regarding the candidacy of Mrs. McDaniels for statewide office. McDaniels was supported by "the St. Louis organization," and Tom Pendergast stated that he would not oppose their candidate. O'Malley writes that he "talked both with Jim Aylward and Senator Truman; both expressed themselves in accordance with Mr. Pendergast's views."

Harry Truman, Senator Thomas P. Gore, and Others

Group portrait of Harry Truman, Senator Thomas P. Gore, and others at a dinner held by the South Central Business Association at the LaSalle Hotel in Gore's honor. Men identified on photo as standing left to right: Dr. C. Charles Gray, Ira S. Burns, James P. Aylward, Judge Truman, Judge Thomas B. Bash and Judge Robert W. Barr. Front row, seated: James M. Pendergast, Gore, Garrett L. Smalley (toastmaster), Charles M. Howell, James R. Page and Father J. W. Keyes.

Governor Stark and the Machine

Statement by a rival of Lloyd Stark in the 1936 Democratic primary for governor. The writer states "when I entered the gubernatorial contest my only hope was that I might help to arouse the people of our State against the infamy of the Pendergast machine," and was concerned about Stark's endorsement by the Pendergast machine. In light of Stark's work to clean up government and elections, however, he states "my attitude for the Governor's courage has become one of unstinted admiration."