Union Station

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The Union Station Massacre

On June 17, 1933, four law enforcement officers and their prisoner, Frank Nash, were fatally wounded in a botched rescue attempt outside Union Station. The story of the Union Station Massacre, as it became known, centered on Frank Nash, who had been convicted of three separate crimes of a serious nature: murder, armed burglary, and then assault.

Washington Township Democratic Club

Clipping entitled "A Real Goat Makes the Trip" from the Kansas City Times on March 28, 1932 that shows Kansas City Democrats boarding trains the previous day to the Democratic State Convention in St. Louis, Missouri. The photograph's caption states, "Members of the Washington Township Democratic Club, a Pendergast organization, are shown with their brown goat mascot, which they took along on one of the special trains. However, the goat will not be in the big parade planned by the local Democrats in St. Louis today. Leaders said it might cause some trouble."

Union Station, Kansas City, Mo.

Postcard showing Union Station at the northwest corner of Pershing Road and Main Street in Kansas City, Missouri. This vantage point faces northwest from the intersection of Pershing and Main. The back of the postcard includes a short letter to Nannie Goldsmith of Clinton, Missouri from her son Henry.

Union Station, Kansas City, Mo.

Postcard showing Union Station at the northwest corner of Pershing Road and Main Street in Kansas City, Missouri. This vantage point faces northwest from the intersection of Pershing and Main. The back of the postcard includes a short letter to Nannie Goldsmith of Clinton, Missouri.

Union Station, Kansas City

Union Station in Kansas City, Missouri, dedicated in 1914. This vantage point faces north-northeast from Liberty Memorial and shows downtown Kansas City, Missouri in the background.

Union Station, Kansas City

Postcard showing Union Station at the northwest corner of Pershing Road and Main Street in Kansas City, Missouri. This vantage point faces northwest from just east of the intersection of Pershing and Main. The back of the postcard includes a short letter to Mrs. Paul Dinkle of Fayette, Missouri.

Union Station Waiting Room

Photograph with slide description: "Waiting room, Union Station, K.C., Mo. (1932)." This vantage point faces north-northwest into the waiting room from the lobby.

Union Station Massacre Scene

Photograph of the front of Union Station in Kansas City where the Union Station Massacre has just happened. Identification on back reads: At right is the automobile of Raymond J. Caffrey, federal officer who conducted Frank Nash to Union Station, at Kansas City, Mo., where he and three other officers as well as Nash, the convict, were slain when gangsters attempted to wrest the prisoner from the officers. Between the cars may be seen two of the officers who were slain in the shooting and behind the wheel of Caffrey's car the head of the slain Nash.

Union Station Lobby

Photograph with slide description: "Lobby, Union Station, Kansas City, Mo." This vantage point faces east with the entrances on the right.

Union Station During a Dust Storm

Dust Bowl period photograph of Union Station during a dust storm on March 20, 1935. This vantage point faces west towards Union Station from just east of Main Street. The caption reads, "Kansas City, March 20.-This is the way the Union station really appeared Wednesday afternoon as sand and earth from Kansas and other states fogged the air in a terrific dust storm. Visibility was clouded to an altitude of 15,000 feet."

Union Station Baggage Area

Postcard of the baggage area at Union Station, currently used by the United States Postal Service. This vantage point faces east-northeast with Union Station in the background.

Train Sheds, Union Station, Kansas City, Mo.

Postcard showing the Kansas City Union Station and its train sheds to the west. This vantage point faces southeast towards Union Station from near the defunct intersection of Broadway Boulevard and Milwaukee Avenue (now 22nd Street). The back of the postcard includes a short letter to Mrs. Harley McCasland of Jefferson City, Missouri.