T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company

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Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today.

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today.

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, describing the inequality of property tax assessments throughout Jackson County and other costs of homeownership. Other featured articles include: “He Beats the Rap but You Take It” (p.

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen describes in detail an investigation by Harvey L. Duncan concerning an alleged theft of an interstate shipment of liquor. Kitchen warns against a conspiracy charge, which would reflect poorly on the Kansas City organization.

Transcript of testimony given by Thomas J. Pendergast Jr. in the office of the Intelligence Unit of the Internal Revenue Service at 1301 Oak Street, Kansas City, Missouri. Internal Revenue Agent P. J. McGrath asks various questions related to Thomas J. Pendergast Jr.'s finances starting in 1932.

Letter signed "Your Friend" to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, reporting that Pendergast's influence (namely liquor sales and gambling) stretches across the state line into Missouri, and encloses a newspaper clipping on that subject.

Letter from John T. Harding to L. H. Forman, discussing anti-Clark/Douglas circulars being "thrown into the river" in St. Louis.

Blank letterhead for T.J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Co. at 525-527 Delaware Street, Kansas City, Missouri.

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He asserts "[t]he first nomination for United States Senator of Harry S. Truman was stolen," and proceeds to argue that point.

Blank order form for the T.J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Co. at 525-527 Delaware Street, Kansas City, Missouri.

Letter from Miss Reta Walters accusing Harry Truman of being in league with Tom Pendergast and providing evidence to support her claim. She also notes prominent Kansas Citians who advocated for clemency for Pendergast after his conviction of tax evasion.

Letter from R. E. Joyce to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on March 26, 1934. After Mitchell inquires if Thomas J. Pendergast received a license to distill spirits, Joyce clarifies that the Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Co. received a permit to rectify (purify) previously distilled spirits.

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