T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company

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Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a notice that Future’s publishers plan to temporarily suspend publication to reorganize the paper, and also note that “youth is interested and youth is organizing,” and “FUTURE is their paper.” Other featured articles include: “Why Charge a Cover?” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 3 and 8, about the selling of merchandise stolen from Kansas merchants in Kansas City pawn shops, and description of the subsequent closing of small shops not tied to the Pendergast machine and sentencing of a black man to 40 years in jail in lieu of convicting the proprietor of a guilty shop at 9th and Main Streets, and other issues. Other featured articles include: “Fame!” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, describing the inequality of property tax assessments throughout Jackson County and other costs of homeownership. Other featured articles include: “He Beats the Rap but You Take It” (p.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen describes in detail an investigation by Harvey L. Duncan concerning an alleged theft of an interstate shipment of liquor. Kitchen warns against a conspiracy charge, which would reflect poorly on the Kansas City organization. Thus, he suggests that any suspect be tried separately, and not as co-conspirators in a large scheme. In order to do this, Kitchen recommends Truman has Bennett C. Clark call Maurice M. Milligan and request that Milligan prosecutes violators separately.

Genre: 
Pamphlets

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He asserts "[t]he first nomination for United States Senator of Harry S. Truman was stolen," and proceeds to argue that point. The Pendergast machine is described as "the most corrupt, the most brazen, gang of thieves who ever looted an American city," and describes the Pendergasts' businesses' activities and obstructions around the city.

Genre: 
Blank forms

Blank order form for the T.J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Co. at 525-527 Delaware Street, Kansas City, Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Miss Reta Walters accusing Harry Truman of being in league with Tom Pendergast and providing evidence to support her claim. She also notes prominent Kansas Citians who advocated for clemency for Pendergast after his conviction of tax evasion. Documents also address Pendergast's involvement in the liquor distilling and distribution business.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from R. E. Joyce to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on March 26, 1934. After Mitchell inquires if Thomas J. Pendergast received a license to distill spirits, Joyce clarifies that the Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Co. received a permit to rectify (purify) previously distilled spirits.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to R. E. Joyce on March 24, 1934. Mitchell inquires if it is true that Thomas J. Pendergast recently received a license to distill spirits.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Citizens' League Bulletin issue with the main article entitled "King of Kansas City, Emperor of Missouri" about the corrupt activities of Boss Tom Pendergast of Kansas City.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Interrogatories to Defendant City Beverage Company in Equity Case No. 5532: Rhea Graef, Plaintiff vs. City Beverage Company, et al., Defendants. The document includes 39 sets of questions "to be answered by an officer or agent of the City Beverage Company." Part of the document includes inquires as to City Beverage Company's business connections to the T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company. The litigant asks that all answers be "limited to the period between January 1, 1936, and May 4, 1948."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Correspondence from Thomas Pendergast Jr. to Margaret Truman Daniel, likely dated after the 1973 publication of her biography about her father, Harry S. Truman. It is unclear if the note was ever delivered or if it remained in Pendergast Jr.'s possession. In it, Pendergast Jr. accuses Harry Truman and James M. Pendergast of betraying his father.

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KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY