Pendergast Machine

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Text of a Kansas City Star article on the August 4, 1936 election in Kansas City. It describes ballot boxes being removed before polls closed, threats made against voters, fake votes, and other problems. Joe Shannon is quoted as saying the election was "so corrupt it was a disgrace to American civilization."

Telegram from Ralph F. Lozier to his son Lue C. Lozier. Ralph informs Lue that if James P. Aylward declines candidacy for U.S. Senate, the Kansas City Democratic Organization will support Ralph.

Letter from C. P. Damron to Governor Lloyd C. Stark. He writes to support Stark's removal of R. Emmet O'Malley from the Missouri state insurance department and his continued work to clean up state government.

Letter from James M. Pendergast to Guy B. Park making an introduction to Robert Esterly.

Letter from Springfield City License Inspector R. D. Cunningham to Lloyd Stark offering the use of an apartment during Stark's visit for the Jackson Day Banquet. He also relays a line from a local newspaper that said "from the present appearance it looked more like Pendergast was a Stark man than Stark was a Pendergast man."

Manuscript in which Milton C. Lewis outlines talking points (possibly for a speech) concerning political, social, and economic issues that affect the Kansas City black community. The first talking point mentions the Pendergast Machine and efforts to dismantle it.

Henry McElroy

Henry F. McElroy was hand picked in 1926 by boss Thomas J. Pendergast to be Kansas City’s first city manager. This gave Pendergast complete control over Kansas City.

General Hospital No. 2 Exterior

"They did not try to build something ‘good enough for Negroes’ but something as good as money could buy." This is how Chester Arthur Franklin, the Republican founder of The Call newspaper and one of Kansas City’s most prominent black leaders, greeted the newly constructed eight-story building that housed General Hospital No. 2, serving the indigent African American population of Kansas City.

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