Pendergast Machine

Displaying 553 - 560 of 560
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Jesse Barrett to Hector Burleigh in which he expresses optimism for the political future, with the descent of the Pendergast regime and the opportunity for Republicans to take future elections.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Francis Wilson to Gray Snyder asking him to investigate whether the actions of his opponent, Grover Childers, were having any detrimental effect.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Frederick R. Barkhurst to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 18, 1935. Barkhurst praises Mitchell for his stance against Thomas J. Pendergast and encourages Mitchell to run for the next governor of Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Katherine W. Halterman in which he expresses his regret that Pendergast retracted his support for Lozier's U.S. Senate candidacy. He comments that, "the Missouri Democracy will not take Judge Truman's candidacy seriously," and believes that Jacob L. "Tuck" Milligan will win.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from James A. Reed to Tom Pendergast regarding Judge C. C. Dickinson's position on the Eighteenth Amendment, and remarks that he thinks "you can trust him to go along and get rid of thise prohibition nuisance."

Genre: 
Manuscripts

Manuscript in which Milton C. Lewis outlines talking points (possibly for a speech) concerning political, social, and economic issues that affect the Kansas City black community. The first talking point mentions the Pendergast Machine and efforts to dismantle it.

Henry McElroy
Author: 
Nancy J. Hulston

Henry F. McElroy was hand picked in 1926 by boss Thomas J. Pendergast to be Kansas City’s first city manager. This gave Pendergast complete control over Kansas City.

General Hospital No. 2 Exterior
Author: 
Jason Roe
Kansas City Public Library

"They did not try to build something ‘good enough for Negroes’ but something as good as money could buy." This is how Chester Arthur Franklin, the Republican founder of The Call newspaper and one of Kansas City’s most prominent black leaders, greeted the newly constructed eight-story building that housed General Hospital No. 2, serving the indigent African American population of Kansas City.

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