Kansas City Star

Displaying 73 - 84 of 97

"There are 150 Men Filling Holes in the Streets Says Matt S. Murray, but Where Are They?"

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on May 3, 1931 showing motorists avoiding potholes with men sleeping in them. A pedestrian asks, "See anyone?" The caption states, "There are 150 Men filling holes in the streets says Matt S. Murray. -But where are they? ('Has anybody looked in the bottom of the holes?')."

"The Ring Master"

Cartoon from the Kansas City Journal-Post before the local election on March 25, 1930. The drawing depicts Tom Pendergast as a ringleader in a circus with his assistant Cas Welch by his side. Their pockets are stuffed with local infrastructure contracts. Spectators to the circus include Henry F. McElroy, Alfred N. Gossett, Charles H. Clark, Bryce B. Smith, Ruby D. Garrett, Elliott H. Jones, Byron Spencer, Frank M. Eviston, James B. Shoemaker, and Joseph B. Shannon.

"The 'Power House', 1908 Main Street"

Clipping from an article on Tom Pendergast entitled "Portrait of 'The Boss'" in the Kansas City Star on February 28, 1932. This photograph shows the outside of the Jackson County Democratic Club, located on the second floor of 1908 Main Street, Kansas City, Missouri.

"The Non Partisan Employment Emporium for Democrats"

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on February 15, 1931 showing Democrats eating around the "Water Main Job Counter" while Tom Pendergast says, "Those without letters from Democratic precinct captains eat at the second table, maybe." Those waiting to say "When do we eat?"

"The Kibitzer Has a Laugh, 'What More Do They Want?'"

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on February 15, 1931 showing Tom Pendergast, Joe Shannon, and Cas Welch enjoying Home Rule of the Kansas City Police Department while trading police action figures. The onlooking "Kibitzer" references a pseudonymous City Hall inside source for the Kansas City Star in the early 1930s.

"The Home Rule Bedtime Story As Told To Our Legislators By Judge McElroy"

Clipping from the Kansas City Star of Tom Pendergast, Joe Shannon, and Cas Welch dressed as old women and knitting while the Kansas City Police Department plays like children on the floor. The signs on the wall show, "God Bless Our Home", "Crime never pays", and "The way of the transgressor is hard".

"The Democratic Machine Makes a Clean Sweep..."

Cartoon from the Kansas City Star after the local election on March 25, 1930. The drawing depicts James P. Aylward driving a street sweeper with Bryce B. Smith, Henry F. McElroy, Alfred N. Gossett, Thomas J. Pendergast, Joseph B. Shannon, and Casimir J. Welch. The caption reads, "The Democratic Machine makes a clean sweep in our recent municipal election."

"Somehow I Don't Feel Too Hopeful"

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "Somehow I Don't Feel Too Hopeful", no date. The drawing shows depictions of "ghost votes" and "protected crime" looking at a depiction of "election and police board appointments". Source: Vivian Fredericks.

"Red-D-Mix Joy Ride"

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on April 23, 1931 showing three men (presumably Tom Pendergast, Cas Welch, and Joe Shannon) taking a joy ride while a young boy holds a sign stating, "We have no money for playground supervision."

"Possibility of Home Rule Suggests 'Tom,' 'Joe' and 'Cas' Uniform"

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on April 22, 1931 shows a satirical concept for police badges to be used by "Goat", "Rabbit", and "Hybrid" factions controlled by Tom Pendergast, Joe Shannon, and Cas Welch, respectively.

"Out of the Frying Pan Into the Fire"

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "Out of the Frying Pan Into the Fire", no date. The drawing shows a depiction of "little business" falling out of the frying pan of New Deal economics and into the fire of "priorities and allocations". Source: Vivian Fredericks.

"Newspapers and Politics: A Newspaper Marauder"

Political attack advertisement that documents Kansas City Star owner August F. Seested's political exploits for personal gain in local real estate. This document was produced to discourage Kansas Citians from voting for Kansas City Police Commissioner Matthew Foster, the Republican candidate for mayor.