Argentine

Displaying 1 - 12 of 21

Student Costumed for a Play, Clara Barton School

Photograph of a student costumed for a play at Clara Barton School. The school served the Mexican community of Kansas City, Kansas, from the 1920s until it was damaged by flooding in 1951.

Railroad Car Bunkhouses

Photograph of railroad cars used as housing for Mexican railroad workers. Many workers were recent immigrants could not find or afford more permanent housing, leading to railroad companies repurposing railcars into bunkhouses for their employees.

Mexican-American Students at Clara Barton School

Photograph of students outside the Clara Barton School. The school served the Mexican community of Kansas City, Kansas, from the 1920s until it was damaged by flooding in 1951.

Mary Franz and Child

A woman and her child outside of the boxcar where they lived. Railroad companies reused cars as housing for Mexican railroad workers, many of whom were recent immigrants could not find or afford more permanent housing.

Mary Franz and Child

A woman and her child in the railyard area where they lived. Railroad companies reused cars as housing for Mexican railroad workers, many of whom were recent immigrants could not find or afford more permanent housing.

Kansas City Structural Steel

Circa 1930 photograph with an aerial view of Kansas City Structural Steel facility and grounds, once located north of Metropolitan Avenue between South 21st and 24th Street in Kansas City, Kansas. This vantage point faces north-northeast and shows the intersection of South 24th Street and Ruby Avenue (center foreground) and the Kansas River (background).

Interview with Sra. Josefa Aguilera Parra

Interview with Senora Josefa Aguilera Parra by Laurie Bretz as part of a project documenting the Kansas City, Kansas, Hispanic community. Aguilera describes doing farm work in California and Colorado for low pay, her experiences of and feelings about the Mexican Revolution, and later settling in the Argentine neighborhood of Kansas City, Kansas, where her husband worked in the Swift meatpacking house.

Interview with Pedro Ibarra and Leonor Ibarra

Interview with Pedro Ibarra and his daughter Leonor Ibarra by Laurie Bretz as part of a project documenting the Kansas City, Kansas, Hispanic community. Pedro describes coming to the United States for work, and describes Mexican workers doing their all of their non-food shopping at the railroad commissary. He says they could also send money back to family in Mexico, but that an employee at the commissary would keep the money and claim they were robbed or that the mail was lost.

Interview with Melquiades Quiroga

Interview with Melquiades Quiroga by Laurie Bretz as part of a project documenting the Kansas City, Kansas, Hispanic community. Quiroga discusses being brought to the United States by his parents in 1915 at the age of 4, and going to work in the ice plant in Argentine in 1928. He describes working 15-20 hour days, and the formation of the union in 1942. After unionizing, he reports higher wages, but also describes pay discrimination, winter work reduction and families living in uninsulated shacks, and the hard work done at the ice plant.

Interview with John and Pascual Madrigal

Two-part Interview with Juan and Pascual Madrigal by Laurie Bretz as part of the Trabajo y Cultura (Work & Culture) Project documenting the Kansas City, Kansas, Hispanic community. The men discuss coming to Kansas City in 1925 after the Mexican Revolution, attending the Clara Barton School that served the Mexican community, working for the Santa Fe railroad and the local ice plant, and unionization efforts in hopes of improving working hours and wages.

Interview with Francisco Ruiz, Millie Rivera, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Amayo, et al. by Robert Oppenheimer

Interview with Francisco Ruiz, Millie Rivera, Mike Sanchez, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Amayo, Carmen Ayala and others by Robert Oppenheimer as part of a project to document the history of the Kansas City, Kansas, Hispanic community. Among the topics discussed are the local Mexican community working for the railroads, on farms, and for the meatpacking companies between the two world wars, unionization efforts, and the movement of workers and their families around the Midwest.

Interview with Danny Gamino and Jose Perres

Interview with Danny Gamino and Jose Perres by Laurie Bretz and Robert Oppenheimer as part of a project documenting the Kansas City, Kansas, Hispanic community. The men describe working in packing houses in the 1940s, and the segregation and discrimination they faced in restaurants, schools, movie theaters, and other parts of the community. They also discuss pay differences between white and Mexican workers prior to unionization, and other protections they were afforded by the union.