18th Street

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Tenth Anniversary and "Progress Edition" of the Kansas City Call newspaper. The paper includes stories about crime and political news, social and church updates, sports stories, and advertisements for local businesses, groceries, and cosmetic products. A spread on page B-3 includes a statement from editor and publisher C. A.

Postcard showing the reviewing stand in front of The Kansas City Star building for the American Legion Parade in Kansas City, Missouri. This parade, along with the Liberty Memorial dedication, took place over three days in late 1921: October 30, 31 and November 1st. Gen. Jacques of Belgium, Gen.

Letter from Louis G. Loschke, assistant cashier at City National Bank & Trust Company, regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Loschke writes that he is Higgins' brother-in-law, and attests the positive assets of his sister and her husband, and his intentions to live a good citizen.

Program for the Silver Jubilee of St. Stanislaus Parish, a Polish congregation at the northeast corner of 18th Street and Ewing Avenue near Blue River. Included are portraits of local clergy including Thomas F. Lillis and Rev. A. F. Radwich; photographs and history of the parish; event details; and advertisements.

Ticket for Friday night dancing to the Rythm Musketeers, a "Broadcasting Dance Band." It notes that "Clubs and Lodges [are] given half of Profits."

View looking west along 18th Street. The Boone and Gem Theaters can be seen on the north side of the street.

Photograph of men standing outside of, and entering, the Kansas City Call Building. This vantage point faces south from 18th Street between Woodland Avenue and Highland Avenue.

Letter from Alma Henderson and Dorothy H. Davis, co-chairmen of The Call's Club Greeting Committee, to members of local clubs regarding the possibility of placing Christmas greetings and other messages in the paper during the holiday season.

Cityscape photograph of 18th Street from atop the Kansas City Call Building, looking northwest with downtown Kansas City in the background. The intersection of 18th Street and Highland Avenue is pictured to the left.

Photograph of a man using the Kansas City Call's linotype machine.

Photograph of men standing outside of the Kansas City Call Building. This vantage point faces south from 18th Street between Woodland Avenue and Highland Avenue.

Document noting the terms and price for the sale of 1823 Highland Avenue, described as a "4 apartment flat," which was to become the headquarters of Musician's Protective Union No. 627. The building was sold for $4,750.

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