Tom Pendergast Inmate File

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Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Parole Hearing Transcript

Transcript of minutes from Tom Pendergast's parole hearing before Arthur D. Wood, chairman of the United States Board of Parole. Pendergast notes his health problems, including a bad heart and colostomy, and lack of prior convictions, as reasons he should be released from the penitentiary. He also discusses his family, his role at Ready Mixed Concrete Company, and a pending indictment in state court.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Parole Denial Press Release

Press release announcing that, after a hearing at the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth and further consideration in Washington, D.C., the United States Board of Parole concluded that "parole issuance in the case of Thomas J. Pendergast would be unjustifiable and incompatible with the public interest," and thus is denied.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Notice of Release

Notice of release for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, registering the details of his release from the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth on May 30, 1940. The report writes that Pendergast was taken into custody by Lewis J. Grout, United States Probation Officer, and asks that attention be given to Pendergast's medical report. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Mugshot

Mugshots of Thomas J. Pendergast, Inmate #55295, contained in a folder noting his conditional release from prison on May 30, 1940. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Monthly Supervision Reports

Monthly supervision reports, conducted by Lewis J. Grout, Probation Officer, for Tom Pendergast upon his release from the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth. The reports for the months of July, August, and September, include his residence, his return to work as president of Ready-Mixed Concrete, his wages and expenses, and other remarks. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Memo from W. Harold Lane to Charles O'B. Berry

Memorandum from W. Harold Lane, Internal Revenue Service Special Agent, to the Special Agent in Charge (elsewhere identified as Charles O'B. Berry), regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo reports that, in a discussion with Governor Lloyd Stark about the conviction of Charles Gargotta for assault of Sheriff Thomas Bash, Stark stated that he suspected that Pendergast was "directing his political organization" while in prison.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Memo from Robert H. Hudspeth to James V. Bennett

Memorandum from Robert H. Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, to James V. Bennett, director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo discusses allegations that Pendergast was running his political organization during his imprisonment, and and investigation by the Intelligence Unit of the Bureau of Internal Revenue into the matter.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Memo from Robert H. Hudspeth to James V. Bennett

Memorandum from Robert H. Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, to James V. Bennett, director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo discusses Pendergast assigning his lawyers power of attorney to deal with his income tax liability with the Treasury Department, and lists Pendergast's visitor log, including attorneys and Treasury Department agents. The memo also notes that Pendergast has paid "a substantial portion" of his back taxes owed. Also included is a letter of introduction from Charles O'B.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Marital Status Confirmation

Letter from N. R. Timmons, Chief Parole Officer at the Leavenworth Penitentiary, to the Jackson County Recorder of Deeds, requesting confirmation of the marital status of Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Recorder John P. Sherrod replies with confirmation that Pendergast married Carolyn "Carrie" E. Snider on February 3, 1911. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: List of Relatives and Requested Correspondents

List of relatives and requested correspondents for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, which includes the names and mailing addresses of his parents, wife, daughters, and other friends and family. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from Mattie Acock to Ruby Carr

Letter from Mattie Acock to Ruby Carr at the Justice Department regarding Tom Pendergast. Acock writes that Pendergast is a "good man" who gave her husband a job and has been "so good to the poor people," and she hopes he "will get to come home right away. She also writes at length about being poor and her other difficulties. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from Mattie Acock to Franklin D. Roosevelt

Letter from Mattie Acock to President Franklin D. Roosevelt regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Acock writes asking for Roosevelt to support Pendergast's parole, and says that Governor Lloyd Stark is mad because Pendergast got former governor Guy B.