Tom Pendergast Inmate File

Displaying 1 - 12 of 45
Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Letter from Special Agent Rudolph H. Hartmann regarding his investigation into Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Notice of release for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, registering the details of his release from the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth on May 30, 1940. The report writes that Pendergast was taken into custody by Lewis J. Grout, United States Probation Officer, and asks that attention be given to Pendergast's medical report. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from U.S. Marshal A. D. Fairbanks to James V. Bennett, Director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Fairbanks inquires as to whether Frank Smith, a long-time friend of Pendergast, could receive permission to visit his friend at the penitentiary, after having been denied in the past due to Pendergast's poor health. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Special Agent in Charge Charles O'B. Berry to W. H. Woolf, acting chief of the Intelligence Unit of the Bureau of Internal Revenue, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Berry addresses the concerns of Governor Lloyd C. Stark that Pendergast was engaged in his political machine while serving his sentence in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, in violation of the terms of his conviction.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Record of interviews and visits for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, including dates of visits by his family members and attorneys between June 5, 1939, and April 9, 1940. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Adolph P. Kern, Chief Probation Officer of Hudson County, New Jersey, to the Honorable Richard A. Chappell, Supervisor of Federal Probation, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Kern writes on behalf of Judge Thomas J. Brown, inquiring ask to probation terms which state that Pendergast cannot engage in politics upon his release, and wanting to know the "authority by which a person can be restrained from reentering public life" while on probation.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Parole Officer Assembly Sheet for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, listing the reports required in each case, including history of correspondence, admission summary, disciplinary actions, and other information. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Mattie Acock to Ruby Carr at the Justice Department regarding Tom Pendergast. Acock writes that Pendergast is a "good man" who gave her husband a job and has been "so good to the poor people," and she hopes he "will get to come home right away. She also writes at length about being poor and her other difficulties. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Letter from Floy Smith to the United States Parole Board regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Smith writes to protest the parole of Pendergast, saying that Pendergast surely "considered himself getting off very easy with only a 15-months' sentence," and that it would be just for him to serve the full sentence. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Memorandum from Robert H. Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, to James V. Bennett, director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo discusses allegations that Pendergast was running his political organization during his imprisonment, and and investigation by the Intelligence Unit of the Bureau of Internal Revenue into the matter.

Object Type: 
Postcards

Unsigned postcard, postmarked Kansas City, Kansas, addressed to Judge Arthur D. Wood, asking if he is "going to pardon that crook from KC," Tom Pendergast. The writer says that doing so would "encourage others to steal likewise," and that the sentence should have been ten times longer. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

List of relatives and requested correspondents for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, which includes the names and mailing addresses of his parents, wife, daughters, and other friends and family. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.