Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman

Displaying 49 - 60 of 108

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, July 28, 1931

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman expresses his yearning to be with Bess and declares that "When I get that courthouse located and the contract let, we'll take another weddin' tour and maybe I can get back on earth (if I'm not in the midst of a state campaign)."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, July 27, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides details on Clark and Truman's political maneuvering: "Clark said he was to see Tuck [Jacob] Milligan yesterday and that he'd rub a little salt on Stark. He thinks maybe we can get 'em all in the race."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, July 25, 1923

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman comments that he is getting in shape while at Fort Leavenworth and exclaims, "I'll be able to lick all the rabbits and the Kansas City Journal too when I get home."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, July 24, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides his opinion on Maurice M. Milligan and Lloyd C. Stark: "I don't want Milligan to run unless he and Stark run together. That would be too good."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, July 24, 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this candid letter, Truman informs Bess that he intends to travel in secret to New York to meet with Tom Pendergast.

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, July 24, 1930

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this rather candid letter, Harry requests Bess to "Please bring my "Anthony" salve. I have a tender place on my saddle connection."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, July 23, 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this particularly candid letter, Truman updates Bess on the politics of Missouri and the nation, saying that "Pendergast hasn't made up his mind yet who will be governor. He'll announce it sometime soon. If the man is smart and politically minded he can say who Clark's successor will be and can deliver the 1940 delegation at the national convention."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, July 22, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel and speaks about Kansas City Bar Association President Henry Depping: "Depping is a Republican and one of the inner circle in K.C. He told me he'd try to get enough Republican candidates into the Senatorial race so they wouldn't vote in my primary."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, July 22, 1930

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and muses upon an alternative time line in which he and Bess were married earlier, commenting that, "I don't see how I got along until I was thirty-four without you. Just think of all the wasted years that could have been pleasantly and profitably spent. I might even have been a financial success if I'd started with you sooner."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, July 22, 1923

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman comments briefly on Kansas City politics: "I see that the Journal is still having a pick at the County Court. If Mr. Dickey had gotten his streets accepted he'd have been pleased with the operation of the court."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, July 21, 1923

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. Truman describes his attraction to the military, then says, "You be a good girl and I'll be a good boy. I have been. I haven't had a thing to drink nor have I drawn a single card."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, July 19, 1923

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman reveals his inclination towards military service, stating that, "I am going to have to write orders for a whole division today, and believe me it's a real job. I won't have time to think of any politicians or jobs or roads either for the balance of the week."