Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman

Displaying 25 - 36 of 108

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, November 10, 1926

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Dodge City, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his campaign for a National Old Trails Road and State Highway for Kansas.

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, November 10, 1926

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Dodge City, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman describes the geography of southwest central Kansas, and exclaims, "...from the look of things we... will have all the cities in this neighborhood pulling for our National Old Trails..."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, May 9, 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Kansas City, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and his Jackson County Courthouse proposal to Conrad Mann, Henry F. McElroy, and Ruby Garrett.

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, May 7, 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Robidoux in St. Joseph, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. On the eve of his forty-ninth birthday, Truman reflects to Bess that, "Politics should make a thief... and a pessimist of anyone, but I don't believe I'm any of them and if I can get the Kansas City courthouse done without scandal no other judge will have done as much, and then maybe I can retire as collector..."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, May 3, 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Baltimore in Kansas City, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and with county matters, saying that, "...the papers tried to start a row between me and the Sheriff. I don't want to start any row but I am going to finish one. He is out on a limb, and I am going to saw it off a little at a time."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, May 3, 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Independence, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and with county matters, saying that, "The sheriff has... closed the Independence jail. He thinks he'll cripple the road work. I'm not sorry he closed the jail because we don't need two and it will give me an excuse to cut some more expense."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, May 11, 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Claridge in Saint Louis, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and his on Jackson County Courthouse proposal. After the courthouse is complete, Truman exclaims that, "...I can probably retire to a quiet job and enjoy life a little bit with my family. Not that I'm not enjoying it now but it is sometimes pretty hard on head and nerves."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, May 1, 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Independence, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his plans for the next two weeks and his recent work making payrolls and salary cuts.

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, March 10, 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of a growing rift between Truman and Bennett C. Clark: "Bennett, I suppose will be in Kansas City Saturday. I told him if he was looking for a split in the Democratic Party he could very easily find it and perhaps now is as good a time as any to have it."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, June 28, 1936

Letter from Harry S. Truman at The Majestic in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman gives Bess his opinion of the 1936 Democratic National Convention and mentions that James M. Pendergast was present. He also makes note that the date marks his seventeenth anniversary with Bess.

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, June 28, 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman writes of their sixteenth anniversary with self-reflection and ambition, commenting that, "I am hoping to make a reputation as a Senator,... but you'll have to put up with a lot if I do it because I won't sell influence and I'm perfectly willing to be cussed if I'm right."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, June 26, 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and expresses his simple desire to be a businessman in a small town. He then recounts a dinner meeting with other Senators, including Joseph F. Guffey. Truman exclaims that, "He has a desire to be a Senate boss and since I don't like Pennsylvania anyway it wasn't hard for me to be against him. He tried to get Tom P. [Pendergast] to bring pressure on me about his real bill and Tom told me about it."