Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman

Displaying 13 - 24 of 108

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, October 25, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his latest political maneuvers with Bennett C. Clark: "Mr. Clark and I have had a time trying to get to the W.P.A. office to recommend a man for [Matthew S.] Murray's place. It looks as if they would really put poor old Murray in the jug."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, October 24, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his trip to Chicago and his breakfast with Leo Packer, Mr. Byers, and Dick Adams. Truman says, "Dick you know was a Republican alderman in Kansas City. He said he is for me and expected to do all he could."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, October 19, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman discusses a few minor personal matters and mentions his activities from the previous day: "...Joe Guffey and I studied the various strains of thoroughbred horses at Laurel (in the interest of agriculture you understand). I lost most of my Saturday's winnings but we had a grand time..."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, October 10, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman discusses a few minor personal matters and then makes a jeer at Missouri governor Lloyd C. Stark, saying, "Well if a counterfeit like Mr. Stark can fool the people, they'll deserve what they get."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, October 1, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Carroll Arms Hotel in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then comments on his present association with the Kansas City political machine: "The terrible things done by the high ups in K.C. will be a lead weight to me from now on, and I've just go to win anyhow and make 'em like it."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, November 9, 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then shows his political persistence: "If I quit this thing now, they'll say that Kemper and the Boss pulled me off, and I'm going to go through with it if I don't get home at all."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, November 9, 1926

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Great Bend, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman elaborates on the hospitality he is receiving in Great Bend, saying that, "This is almost like campaigning for President except that the people are making promises to me instead of the other way around."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, November 8, 1926

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Worthington Hotel in Herington, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman describes some of the men in power in Herington including the postmaster: "His name is Dave Naill and he is considered an authority on Republican politics in Kansas. He's got Tom [Pendergast] backed off the boards as a boss."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, November 3, 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman shows his commitment to the state and his ideals: "I went into the R.R. business again today and I think got some more real information. I have a notion it didn't please Mr. [William T.] Kemper [Sr.] very much. But I can't help it. I'm not working for him. I'm working for Missouri."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, November 28, 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides some candid information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "…[Bennett C.] Clark has definitely lined up with the Boss [Tom Pendergast] you see. He and Maurice Milligan almost came to blows the last time they met and now the Pres and [Lloyd C.] Stark are thinking of running him for Senator against Clark."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, November 22, 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides the latest information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "I missed a call from [Joseph B.] Shannon... Jim P. [Pendergast] said he hoped I'd keep him here but I'm glad he's going home. He says [Lloyd C.] Stark will run against [Bennett C.] Clark and not against me."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, November 15, 1926

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Gibbons in Dayton, Ohio to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel east to Dayton and then speaks about the newly erected Liberty Memorial: "...Will Rogers says it looks like a silo. Other people have the right slant on R.A. Long's monument to himself as well as us perverted people who only fought the war behind a gun."