Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression

Collet, John C.

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7
Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

U.S. Attorney's report on Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, which records Higgins' defense attorney, summarizes the charges, and notes the sentence imposed. The report notes that the income Higgins is charged with evading taxes on was received from "protected gamblers and other forms of organized vice." U.S. Attorney Richard K. Phelps recommends against parole, while Judge J. C.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

U.S. Attorney's report on Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, recording Higgins' defense attorney, summarizing the charges, and noting that "the aggravating circumstances are that the income unreported by this prisoner was derived form the lowest and worst elements of the organized underworld of Kansas City." U.S. Attorney Richard K. Phelps reports that local mobster Charles Carollo is a suspected associate, and recommends against parole. Judge J. C. Collet does not concur, noting that this conviction is Higgins' first offense.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Judgment and commitment in Criminal Case No. 14653: United States vs. Otto P. Higgins, defendant. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, entered a plea of guilty to counts 3 and 4 of income tax evasion, counts 1 and 2 having been entered nolle prosequi, and was sentenced to the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth for two years on count 3 and five years probation on count 4. He was delivered to the penitentiary on November 3, 1939.

Object Type: 
Transcriptions

Transcript of the parole hearing for Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, before the Judge T. Webber Wilson. Wilson questions Higgins about his crime of income tax evasion, his work and personal history, and his plans for work should he be paroled.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses the matter of a new Judge for the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Kitchen asserts that the court needs a judge from Missouri as it does not currently have a Missouri judge that can devote their time to hearing cases. Kitchen then recommends Charlie Carr for the position and asks Truman to pass this recommendation on to Bennett C. Clark and President Roosevelt.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Charles W. Dickey to Lloyd C. Stark discussing campaign activities and supporters in Dade and Greene counties in southern Missouri, as well as which candidate Pendergast intends to support.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from F. E. Whitten to Jesse Barrett describing the atmosphere in Kansas City in response to federal investigations into the Pendergast Machine.