Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression

Bland, Ewing C.

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Object Type: 
Advertisements
Photographs

Advertisement for the re-election of Ewing C. Bland as Judge of the Kansas City Court of Appeals, Jackson County, Missouri. The document states that Bland has bi-partisan support from over 1,000 members of the bar.

Object Type: 
Clippings
Photographs

Clipping from the Kansas City Journal-Post on October 16, 1932 showing the attendees of the funeral of Francis M. Wilson, Democratic Candidate for Governor of Missouri that year until his death. Those present include Tom Pendergast, Joe Shannon, Guy Park, Lloyd Stark, Thomas Bash, et al.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Kansas City Court of Appeals judge, Ewing C. Bland, to his uncle, Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on January 16, 1918. Bland recommends against using Joe Shannon to use for political influence and instead suggests Mike Casey, an attorney with close ties to Tom Pendergast.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Kansas City Court of Appeals judge, Ewing C. Bland, to his uncle, Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on December 11, 1920. Bland inquires if Sanford Madden should continue his campaign for marshal since he does not have the support of all Kansas City political factions.

Object Type: 
Manuscripts

A ten page typewritten history of Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.'s political career in relation to Missouri politics through 1935 when the President of the United States removed him from office.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals judge Ewing C. Bland on January 18, 1937. Mitchell provides a heated and sometimes vulgar response to Bland's letters of May 14th and 16th, 1937. He asserts that James M. Pendergast influences the District Court of Appeals in Kansas City and that James P. Aylward is "not only hand in glove with the [Pendergast] outfit but is one of its exalted leaders." Mitchell implies that Bland should resign if Marie Plummer is not reinstated in her clerical position at the court.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 2, 1937. Plummer reports that a friend, Clif Langsdale, was able to extend her employment as deputy clerk at the Kansas City Court of Appeals potentially until August 1, 1937. She recounts a conversation she had with Bland in which Bland does not believe the court to be influenced by Pendergast since the machine does not dictate opinions. However, Plummer believes the court to be compromised since all recently hired employees come with a Pendergast endorsement.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals judge Ewing C. Bland on February 11, 1934. Mitchell requests information concerning the Kansas City Republican organization’s ticket and strategy for the upcoming local election.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals Judge Ewing C. Bland, on December 31, 1920. Mitchell comments that Sanford Madden should not the support of all Kansas City political factions in order to be a strong candidate for marshal. Mitchell contends that Thomas J. Pendergast's endorsement is not needed if Madden has the support of James A. Reed and Judge Miles Bulger.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals Judge Ewing C. Bland, on January 25, 1937. Mitchell asserts that Bland should resign as judge if Pendergast continues to influence the court. He then substantiates his claim by providing quotes from Bland and Marie Plummer. Mitchell also provides a case as to why Plummer should be retained in her clerical position at the Kansas City Court of Appeals.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Kansas City Court of Appeals judge, Ewing C. Bland, to his uncle, Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 13, 1934. Bland provides Mitchell with the requested information concerning the Kansas City Republican organization's ticket and strategy for the local election. He prefaces his answers with an explanation of how local elections work in Kansas City.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Marie Plummer on January 18, 1937. Mitchell confirms that he sent a letter to Judge Ewing C. Bland concerning Plummer's termination at the District Court of Appeals in Kansas City. He does not believe there is anything he can do in aiding Plummer's reinstatement there and cautions her about making threats. He says, "It would not cost over $50 to have you assassinated, and if you were[,] certainly nothing would be done about it." Mitchell then suggests that she should always be accompanied by someone.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.