Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression

Board of Election Commissioners

Displaying 1 - 12 of 41
Object Type: 
Clippings
Photographs

Clipping entitled "'Their Terms Have Expired'" from the Kansas City Journal-Post on July 28, 1937 with caption stating, "That was the only reason given Tuesday by Gov. Lloyd C. Stark, en route home to Jefferson City after a vacation, for refusal of the request of T. J. Pendergast that he rename George V. Aylward and Fred Bellemere as members of the election board. The governor gave that "reason" as he had breakfast aboard the train as shown in the photo."

Object Type: 
Clippings
Photographs
Drawings

Clipping from the Kansas City Times on February 16, 1937 showing drawings and photographs from the 1936 Election Vote Fraud Trial. Included are depictions of the courtroom, evidence, and corridor outside of the courtroom. Vincent J. Doherty (Chief Deputy Election Commissioner), Fred M. Bellemere (Chairman of the Board of Election Commissioners), and Maurice M. Milligan (U.S. District Attorney).

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Memorandum containing a statement from an unnamed former member of the Kansas City Board of Police Commissioners and his contacts with Charles Binaggio. He describes efforts by "the Binaggio political group" to remove him from the police board, and a meeting with Binaggio arranged by Herman Rosenberg, wherein Binaggio stated that he felt his group was due patronage and favors due to their support of Governor Smith's election.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Governor Lloyd C. Stark to W. W. Filkin regarding honest elections and voter intimidation.

Object Type: 
Pamphlets

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He asserts "[t]he first nomination for United States Senator of Harry S. Truman was stolen," and proceeds to argue that point. The Pendergast machine is described as "the most corrupt, the most brazen, gang of thieves who ever looted an American city," and describes the Pendergasts' businesses' activities and obstructions around the city.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Hugh O'Connor to Guy B. park demanding an investigation into the August 4, 1936 primary election and the ouster of the election commissioners and election judges and clerks.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from J. E. Woodsmansee, chairman of the Kansas City Board of Election Commissioners, to Governor Lloyd C. Stark discussing the work of the Board and a conversation he had with Pendergast wherein Pendergast "assured me he would emphatically inform his organization that it must adhere strictly to the letter of the law and the rulings of the Board of Election Commissioners."

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from I. N. Watson to Jesse Barrett discussing the recent Kansas City election, and the landcape of fraudulent voting and corruption which persists, despite recent reforms.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Hugh O'Connor to Guy B. Park asserting that the governor is surely a proper person to hear complaints about election fraud in the state and listing specific allegations from the recent primary election.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Paul G. Koontz to Governor Lloyd C. Stark regarding the activities of election clerks and precinct captains in local elections. He is concerned that "Charter Party precinct captains insist on accompanying [election] clerks," and believes "the Election Board has the situation well in hand."

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Article by E. Montgomery Reily in which he discusses the practice of Republicans voting in the Democratic primary during the recent election.

Object Type: 
Pamphlets

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He first responds to Harry Truman's statement to a reporter that "he never had sought the support of the Pendergast political organization in Missouri" and that the Pendergast machine was not involved in scandal until after he was elected to the Senate.

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