Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression

Elections--1940

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9
Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Glidewell to Governor Stark encouraging him to consider running in the upcoming 1940 presidential election.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Malcolm D. Grimes to Jesse Barrett urging him to run again for Governor of Missouri "now that Gov. Stark has about finished off 'Uncle Tom.'"

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Anonymous letter to Governor Lloyd Stark him for his efforts at taking down the St. Louis and Kansas City political machines.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Anonymous letter, assumedly to LLoyd Stark, threatening him if Missouri elects a Republican governor and punishes Tom Pendergast.

Object Type: 
Pamphlets

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He asserts "[t]he first nomination for United States Senator of Harry S. Truman was stolen," and proceeds to argue that point. The Pendergast machine is described as "the most corrupt, the most brazen, gang of thieves who ever looted an American city," and describes the Pendergasts' businesses' activities and obstructions around the city.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Anonymous letter outlining WPA-related corruption taking place in Kansas City, and praising Stark for his efforts at reform.

Object Type: 
Pamphlets

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He first responds to Harry Truman's statement to a reporter that "he never had sought the support of the Pendergast political organization in Missouri" and that the Pendergast machine was not involved in scandal until after he was elected to the Senate.

Object Type: 
Correspondence
Clippings

Letter and newspaper clipping sent by J. R. Proctor to Governor Stark concerning the upcoming Senatorial race.

Object Type: 
Transcriptions

Text of a speech given by William E. Byers in Slater, Missouri on April 20, 1939. It discusses the activities of the Pendergast political machine and his hope for a future government based on "Americanism."