Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression

Election Fraud

Displaying 1 - 12 of 101
Object Type: 
Clippings
Photographs
Drawings

Clipping from the Kansas City Times on February 16, 1937 showing drawings and photographs from the 1936 Election Vote Fraud Trial. Included are depictions of the courtroom, evidence, and corridor outside of the courtroom. Vincent J. Doherty (Chief Deputy Election Commissioner), Fred M. Bellemere (Chairman of the Board of Election Commissioners), and Maurice M. Milligan (U.S. District Attorney).

Object Type: 
Clippings
Photographs

Clipping entitled, "The Thirteen Jurors Who Will Hear the Vote Fraud Trial" from the Kansas City Times on February 16, 1937. The caption provides the name, profession, and hometown of each juror, all of whom live outside of Jackson County.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Citizens' League Bulletin issue with the main article reporting on the 1936 Election Voter Fraud Trials and general corrpution in Kansas City. Other articles document the cost of crime, air transportation, tax dogers, economic plans, federal salaries, and Kansas City gambling.

Object Type: 
Clippings
Photographs

Clipping from the Kansas City Times on July 3, 1937 showing William D. Boyle of Boyle-Pryor Construction Company, Thomas J. Pendergast, and James M. Pendergast, all of whom allegedly assisted defendants in the 1936 Election Vote Fraud Trails. The caption for each photograph includes a quote from that person.

Object Type: 
Clippings
Photographs

Clipping of Frances B. Ryan from the Kansas City Journal-Post on April 1, 1937 with caption stating, "Mrs. Frances Ryan, Pendergast political leader of the Twelfth ward, county Democratic committeewoman, and superintendent of the Jackson County Parental school, was charged in an indictment returned by the federal grand jury Thursday, with violating a national election law in the November election. She is said to have been the first woman ward leader in Kansas City."

Object Type: 
Clippings
Photographs

Clipping from Time (magazine) on February 22, 1937 detailing the election fraud that occured in Kansas City during the 1936 General Election. The article features extended quotes from Judge Albert L. Reeves concerning the election fraud, including the following: "We can't surrender the ballot boxes to thugs, gangsters and plug-uglies who patrol the streets with machine guns. We can't stand for that any longer." The article then provides a history of political corruption in Kansas City through 1936.

Memorandum from John N. McCormick to Harold G. Robinson regarding former Kansas City city councilman Hurley Daily's remarks on the issue of election fraud. According to Daily, there were 60,000 "ghost votes" in 1937, and that "it was a general procedure in a primary, votes could be bought for fifty cents and general elections one dollar." Daily also offers the opinion that Tom Pendergast and former crime boss Charles Carollo were behind the John Lazia murder.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 3 and 8, about the selling of merchandise stolen from Kansas merchants in Kansas City pawn shops, and description of the subsequent closing of small shops not tied to the Pendergast machine and sentencing of a black man to 40 years in jail in lieu of convicting the proprietor of a guilty shop at 9th and Main Streets, and other issues. Other featured articles include: “Fame!” (p.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the crime rate for auto theft and parts stripping in Kansas City compared to Saint Louis and description of its inaccurate measurements by the Kansas City Police Department not accepted by the FBI, with photo of a stripped car and a portrait of J. Edgar Hoover. Other featured articles include: “One Year Ago This Week” (p.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, discussing the difficulty of accessing city records for citizens or reporters. Other featured articles include: “Snapshots” (p. 1), with quick items that include Nell Donnelly Reed having been rated fourth in a list of the most prominent business women in the country; “Seven Eleven” (p.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 3 and 8, about the election frauds in Kansas City government, with a photo of fraudulent signatures in a precinct book and a photo of Gil Bourk, promoter of "permanent registration." Other featured articles include: “Missouri Valley Authority” (p. 2), about a proposed Missouri analog of the New Deal Tennessee Valley Authority; “Better Driving” (p.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about J. C. Nichols and his city planning projects in Kansas City with the Country Club residential district and Country Club Plaza shopping center, etc., including a photo of Nichols. Other featured articles include: “To Better Serve His Clients” (p.

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