Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression

American Legion

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9
Object Type: 
Correspondence

The author urges Lloyd Stark's secretary Sallye Powell to communicate Stark's schedule for a Legion Convention in Springfield to Jerry Duggan.

Object Type: 
Clippings
Photographs

Newspaper article reporting on a speech given by Frederick E. Whitten in which he rails against the corruption of the Pendergast organization.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

This letter from Kitchen recommends placing an advertisement in the 'Missouri Legionnaire' in response to one placed by his competitor in the gubernatorial primary. He concludes by encouraging Lloyd Stark to meet very soon with Tom Pendergast because he learned that the Kansas City strongman was soon to have surgery in New York.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Report from William Kitchen on the status of Lloyd Stark's gubernatorial campaign in various communities across Missouri.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Charles D. Osborne to gubernatorial candidate Lloyd Stark in which the author makes a recommendation for a recipient of WPA funds and discusses American Legion members' support of his candidacy.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Missouri candidate for governor Francis Wilson to Lloyd C. Stark criticizing his opponent, Russel Dearmont as too good-looking and inquiring about his war record.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Josephine Lay to gubernatorial candidate Lloyd Stark discussing attitudes about his recent endoresement by Tom Pendergast.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

The charter for American Legion Wayne Miner Post No. 149, created and signed in August 1920. Wayne Miner Post No. 149 was organized by African American World War I veterans in September 1919 and was named for U.S. Army Private Wayne Miner, believed to be one of the last American soldiers to die in World War I.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Photograph of the members of Wayne Miner Post No. 149, American Legion, Kansas City, Missouri. This picture was taken on October 20, 1921 by J.E. Miller at Lincoln High School at the northeast corner of Tracy Avenue and 19th Street.